Category Archives: Reduced

Tenth Avenue Opulence For $277,000 Less. Who Wants To Has It?


[Editor's Note: It is recommended you watch the video first.]

There is a lot to love about this listing at 261 10th Ave, especially “savings the money”, but I’m not quite sure what’s to love more:

Is it the insanely awesome gold coverlet accented by leopard print throw pillows and zebra print chair?

Is it the built in ballet studio that screams tutus and Baryshnikov? However, the ceiling looks a little low to soar like a Swan…

Is it the animal paintings in the foyer that look to be horses, or maybe at least one Giraffe?

Or could it simply be the recent price reduction to start off the new year? A price reduction from an original asking of $1,675,000 to the New Year’s price of $1,398,000…more than a QUARTER MILLION DOLLARS.

It’s at a juncture like this when (proper) staging comes in handy, as does realistic pricing and shelving any visions of grandeur and opulence. Personal tastes aside, this is a great house, in an excellent location.

Who wants to has it?

-261 10th Ave, 4 bed, 3.5 bath, $1,398,000 (MLS)
-Find me on the Facingbook

BFD Price Reductions

A post wherin I look at price reductions that seem to be pointless.

1. Courtesy of SF Schtuff, 1001 California St., #3 is a super lux condo in the old Hitchcockian San Francisco splendor. (MLS gallery offers house porn to die for, here.)

The original price here was $7,250,000. Now it’s $6,950,000. Indeed, one could argue a $300K price break is nothing to sneeze at. But really, the person who can afford the new price could also afford the old price, especially since this home includes an HOA of $5886 per month. So, $300,000? Big  ****ing deal. The monthly payments are still going to top the GNP of certain third world countries.

Here’s another reduction I don’t think makes any difference. 2421 Clement St. This is a 10 unit building, “fully rented,” originally priced at $1,435,888. More than 50 days later, it’s reduced to $1,398,000.

In this case,  it’s not so much the amount of the reduction. I just wonder who would ever want to buy a 10-unit building in SF when every other day a law here makes being a landlord a bigger headache than it already was. In fact, this Examiner article highlights the dubious joys of landlords who are currently suing the city to block such laws. Good luck.

So I wonder, in the world of real estate, if price reductions aren’t sometimes just not that much of an incentive after all.

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Photo of 1001 California, #3 via listing agent Betty Brachman, Brachman Group.

2185 Bush #307 At The Amelia Price Reduced (almost) $100,000!

Shameless plug is the name of the game here. Moments ago we chopped the price of 2185 Bush #307 from $869,000 (previously $899,000) down to $799,999. Are you kidding! This is a 3 bed, 2 bath, 1290 square foot condo with high ceilings, wood burning fireplace, patio, and so much more in one of the best locations around (we could almost call this Pacific Heights, but it is technically in Lower Pacific Heights), so please spread the word.

2185 Bush #307:
2185bush307

If you, or anybody you know, are interested in a great condo in a superb location, drop us a line or come visit the property Sunday 7/26 from 2-4pm for an Open House. This is a great unit and it (hopefully) won’t last long on the market at this new price.

-2185 Bush #307, $799,999 [listing detail]

Price Chopping “Curbed SF” Style

Sorry dear friends over at Curbed SF, but we’re using your line. We have to, because what better way to announce prices are getting chopped on some of our listings?

The first to chop is 2185 Bush #307:
2185bush307

We started out at $899,000 (now $869,000), interest was high, but the market has spoken. It’s time for a change, and what better way to change than drop the price $30,000 on this awesome top floor condo in the best location. Tell your friends!

Second to go is 200 Townsend #47:
200town505

We just chopped $20,000 (now $659,000) off the price and that would certainly pay for a few beers at a Giants game. (You could stumble there, this unit is so close.) Top floor, soaring ceilings, bright, 2 bathrooms, modern kitchen, hip and urban. Tell your friends!

For those of you that simply love to say, “I toldja so.” Have at it. Your day is here.

-2185 Bush #307 [MLS]
-200 Townsend #47 [MLS]

You Changed Your DOM But Were Never BOM, 4148 23rd St Returns

You know that feeling you get when you meet someone and you just know you’ve seen them before, but you just can’t figure out where? Well, fortunately for us folks in the biz of real estate, we have this little feature called “property history” that is becoming all too necessary to check religiously. As it turns out, we have seen 4148 23rd St (4 bed, 2.5 bath, Renovated Noe Valley Edwardian) before.

414823rdfront

We saw her first in 1998 when she sold for $435,000. Then we saw her again (with a face-lift) in April of 2008 for $1,799,000 when she was on the market for 140 days and pulled off the market in August. She resurfaced (very briefly) in December of 2008 with the same look, only different price ($1,599,000 or 11% less than before) and a fresh new DOM (days on market) of zero. Come to think of it, we never did see her BOM (back on market).

414823rdbath

Now we see her again in January 2009 with the same price, but new DOM, and still no BOM. This can only mean she never did find a suitor. So why the new DOM? It’s a trick we agents play, and the public is on to us.

We knew we saw her before, and it almost slipped passed us. Now we’re left to wonder what she’ll look like when we see her again…SOLD, BOM, or with yet another new DOM?

-4148 23rd St, $1,599,000 [listing detail page by sfnewsletter]
-Resetting DOM, Buyers Speak Up, ABC News Nightline Is Listening [theFrontSteps]

Reduction Redux, in which I pick up the Gauntlet

When I posted Reduction Ad Nauseum,  I really just wanted a read on how the educated real estate populace explains and/or reacts to listings that have suffered not one, not two, but three or more price cuts. Still, one commenter Noe Guy said:

“Interesting observations but I wouldn’t put too much stock in them. First, you      picked all TICs. TICs were always more of a speculative area of the market–get financing as a group, hold everything together via legal contract, hope for condo lottery, refinance. Everything about it is more speculative, hence the standard discount of TICs to condos… In this market, that discount should be steeper due to higher risk.

In addition to the more speculative aspect of the TIC market, I’ve always believed that it’s very difficult to accurately price a TIC. It’s not just the property that’s for sale. It’s the property, the actual contract, and the partnership with other owners. Those other two intangibles (from an economic standpoint) make the market less transparent, less liquid, and more difficult to price.

The evidence you’ve sited above clearly makes this case, but keep it in context and look outside of TICs if you want a clearer picture…”
 
Well, geez, what observations? I just observed 3 properties with 3 or more cuts, and opined that buyers (like me, someday, Obama willing) tend to look at reduced properties as Tijuana specials, as in: $500K now? No, no, I don’t think so. Here’s $300K and a pity hug. My final offer.
 
But okay, Noe Guy. See, I love a challenge (else why would I be so sure I can buy a house on an English teacher’s salary, eh?). So here you go, 3 more properties, decidedly not TICs, that have come down more thrice or more in their careers on the market.

Continue reading

Reduction, Ad Nauseum

I’m not a Realtor, so I’ll tell something I’m more qualified to comment on: buyers’ perspectives. For instance, I can tell you how buyers looks at a property that’s been reduced more than twice. We feel sorry for them. They’re like awkward teenage boys at their first dance, pretending to be terribly busy with their shoe laces to avoid eye contact. We all know these boys can’t really be too picky; they have to take what they can get.

This analogy might not totally work for reduced priced properties. I’m just saying that as a buyer, we tend to feel a lot more powerful when we notice a home’s asking has come down not once, but twice– a feeling that multiplies with each subsequent reduction. That’s why, as a seller, I’d really hope my agent were savvy enough to price my home right. Of course, we can’t, unless we are Dione Warwick, know what the future holds, and some of the current meltdown has caught us by surprise. Still, the writing’s been on the wall awhile. Most literate people, I’d think, would have read it.

Case in point the next three properties, whose reduction history goes from bad to worse.

1. Studio TIC at 1059 Leavenworth St #5 San Francisco, CA 94109. Current price: $325,000. In over 120 days on the market, the list price has come down thrice:

Jul 02, 2008 $399,000
Jul 03, 2008 $329,000
Sep 09, 2008 $325,000 

2. 532 Clipper St #B San Francisco, CA 94114, currently at $539,000 is a 2 bed/1 bath TIC flat. In over 170 days on the market, it’s suffered 5 reductions, each one not very big, but the conglomeration of so many price cuts is pretty damning:

May 14, 2008 $679,000
Jun 11, 2008 $659,000
Aug 13, 2008 $639,000
Aug 28, 2008 $599,000
Sep 25, 2008 $570,000
Oct 28, 2008 $539,000

3. 3630 22nd St., San Francisco, CA.  A 2bed/1bath detached cottage TIC, this one I’ve saved for “worst” because though it has not been cut as often as the above property, the overall slash down is quite dramatic. In over 100 days on the market:

Jul 18, 2008 $749,000
Sep 05, 2008 $649,000
Oct 06, 2008 $589,000
Oct 29, 2008 $499,000

In this last case, the current price seems a lot more fair. I went to the open house yesterday and the listing agent informed me the place needed about $250K in repair and pest control. I have to wonder who would have ever, ever, ever paid the original list price.

I also wonder what other SF real estate agents or buyers or sellers think of these reductions overall, so I’m serving this blog up on the Front Steps for commentary. Take it easy on those awkward teen age boys though. Everyone, and everything, is fragile right now.

Living High for a Little Less: 188 Minna #27D (St. Regis, San Francisco)

Stalefish at the St. Regis, San Francisco.
stregisdrive
Originally listed at $3,495,000 for this 2 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 1792 square foot, luxury slice of pie in the sky, the price has been dropping, while the days on market have been climbing. Price now, $2,995,000. Days on market, 150. (That would actually be an interesting chart to see how as the DOM goes up, the price comes down.)

Since we’re talking about the St. Regis, you buyers out there might like to know of what else you can get in that building. You can get the penthouse for $70 Million (or a bit less), or, take your pick from this list. Just because it might be “expired” or “withdrawn”, or not on MLS, doesn’t mean it can’t be sold. And guess what? We know the scoop, so don’t hesitate to contact us if you’d like to learn more.

It also begs the question, “Is the addition of Millennium Tower to our market hurting sales at the St. Regis?”

-St. Regis Penthouse on sale for $70 Million [sfgate.com]

New Developments Face a New Reality in SF

 

I’ve heard from multiple sources that SF real estate is, for the most part, immune to the havoc wreaked on other parts of the US. But sales at our most recent condo complexes show that happy-smile-don’t-worry line of rhetoric is about as reliable as the clown’s was in Poltergeist (Happy Halloween!).

 

 
Socketsite reports that Symphony Towers, with only 55% of its units sold, has recently reduced prices 30%. The “Tower One Close Out,” advertised on the building’s webpage, demonstrates:
 
T-907 Penthouse studio w/built in Murphy bed & views $515,000 $419,000
T-602 1-br, Quiet courtyard location $565,000 $449,000
 
You have to wonder if those buyers among the 55% sold group are perhaps a wee bit upset. You might also wonder if you can’t, given the hint of desperation (“close out”= we really, really want to sell these goddamn condos!), get one of these units for even less than the advertised price.
 
Plus, Symphony Towers is not the only recent development cutting prices. The Hayes is also making cuts, despite its central location and uber-hip marketing (including requisite “ambient” track playing over your web tour of the property, a photo from which appears below). #610, for example, is a 1 bed/1 bath down now from $599K to $499K.  
inside "The Hayes," life is fabulously vogue

 

 
The Arterra, our newish “green” building at 300 Berry St. is also offering reduced prices, (such as #904, a 1 bed/1bath down from $649K to $599K), as is The Potrero.  
 
More good news for people who love bad news is that, according to the San Francisco Business Times, construction has been suspended at 535 Mission St: “The $100 million HOK-designed tower was put on hold earlier this month in response to worsening market conditions.”   
 
Well then. Seems like if one wants to buy right now, one should take these worsening conditions to the negotiating table. Don’t invite the clown.
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Photo credits, respectively: Scary ass clown: Brain Handles.com; The Hayes staged unit: The Hayes.com.
 
 
 

Classic Noe Valley Edwardian, Extensively Renovated…and Reduced

Did we just write that? A Classic Noe Valley Edwardian, Renovated, yet reduced? We did indeed.

It turns out $1,495,000 isn’t the best price for 3774 23rd Street. This 3 bed, 2.5 bath 1561 square foot home has a laundry list of new amenities, including “new foundation with steel & full seismic upgrades” (what constitutes “full seismic upgrades” is up for debate), and the price was just reduced to $1,450,000.

Just throwing it out there…

Since you’re probably wondering, last sale 2001 for $675,000 (asking $499,500) as a total fixer.

-3774 23rd Street [sfnewsletter listing detail page]