3843 22nd Street (Noe Valley) Has A Nice Kitchen And A Pool…In The Same Room!

Thirty eight forty three (3843) 22nd Street in Noe Valley is hitting the market* any minute, and you’re getting your first look inside, right here. Unassuming from the front, but dramatic on the inside, you know you want this property.





If you happen to work at Facebook, Google, Salesforce, Twitter, Zynga, or any of the countless other companies that are booming in our area, adding thousands of jobs, and helping to sustain our real estate market, this might just be the home for you, and I want to get you in there. Just make sure if you do purchase this home, your guests bring adequate bathing attire (or not), and remove mobile devices from their pockets at the front door (along with car keys and MUNI passes).

I’ll make the margs….

-3843 22nd Street, 3 beds, 2.5 baths, $1,799,000 [For more details.]

*”On the market” has long been associated with “on MLS”, as opposed to the thousands of “off market”, or “not on MLS” opportunities that abound.

240 Round Hill In Tiburon For Sale, So Close To San Francisco, And Not Yet On MLS

I’m not quite sure just how many people from around the world hit this here little (20,000 monthly unique visitors) real estate blog looking for Marin real estate, but one thing I do know is that Marin is pretty damn hard to beat. It’s a hop, skip, and a jump away from one of the best cities in the world, the weather is fantastic, the commute is minor, and the schools are awesome. Because of this, I often find myself browsing Marin real estate, both on and “off market” (not on MLS), and recently came across this $3,250,000 Tiburon pocket listing.

Five bedrooms, four and one half baths, views of Golden Gate Bridge & Bay, designer kitchen, family room with fireplace, formal living room with fireplace (yes that’s two fireplaces), formal dining area, two car attached garage (no parking sticker needed), level yard & gardens (not the postage stamp variety either)…and should I go on?



If you’ve been dying to move to San Francisco, but have children and just can’t seem to figure out the logic and lottery that is the San Francisco Unified School District, then you might consider Tiburon. And if you want modern, open space, and the calming effects of water, then this property might just be the place for you, and I happen to know a damn good Realtor that can get you in before the rest.

Oh, and if you’re worried about the commute to San Francisco, don’t. You can take the ferry to work! You’ll be so green all of your friends will wonder why you never have to buy $6/gallon gas!

-Tiburon Pocket Listing [PocketListings.net]
-Agent/property website

Vodka, Eggs, Hefe Weizen, And Crab…Oh My! Happy Easter!

I am off for the Easter Holiday Weekend, so I thought I’d share a little taste of how it goes down in Casa Clark.



Everyone that is in attendance at the feast is given a one of a kind egg designed and colored by someone else in the family the day before. Find your egg, sit down, drink Vodka, toast the good life, and forget the stress (everyone has to make a toast…and we have a big family). Chase with delicious seafood (Crab, Shrimp, Oysters…), and excellent German Hefe Weizen! A little bit of Russian and German tradition makes for a great time.

Happy Easter all! I look forward to working with all of you whether buying or selling, so please keep contacting me with all of your real estate needs, whether buying or selling. It puts Vodka on the table at family gatherings, and I can’t thank you enough!

And yes, we always have room for you at the table, and plenty of eggs in the basket.

What Your Realtor Is Thinking…

“Alex,
You really need to post this one on your blog. I haven’t laughed this hard in sometime…

Hope you’re well.
Cheers
[Previous Client]“

Be careful, there are quite a few F-bombs and vulgarities in this video, so if you’re at work, put the volume on low, and remember, as much as you know about the market and your home’s value by browsing Zillow’s incredibly inaccurate Zestimates, your Realtor (likely) knows more. Listen to them!

“San Francisco Single-Family Home Prices Surge in March”, “Foreign Buyers” Wielding All Cash To Blame

[Editor's Note: Below is a carbon copy of the San Francisco Association of Realtors Market Focus Report. Remember...read the data, not the headlines. Each block in San Francisco is different.]

SAN FRANCISCO, CA, April 15, 2011 – The median sale price of single-family homes in San Francisco continued to strengthen in March, according to the latest Market Focus report published by the San Francisco Association of REALTORS®.

The report indicates that the median sale price has rebounded by an impressive 25.7 percent to $765,000 since the start of the year, although the year-over-year median price has declined 3 percent. The cause most often cited for the decline is the expiration of federal home purchase tax credits in June of last year and the difficulty experienced by buyers in securing financing for home purchases after the financial crisis of 2008.

Completed sales of single-family homes in March also have declined 3 percent from March of last year, although they have increased by 17.5 percent since the beginning of the year. The recent surge in sales is attributed to seasonal factors.

One area that has consistently seen a high level of sales activity is the Sunset district in the southwestern part of the city. Sales in the district have increased 28.1 percent on a year-over-year basis.

The Sunset district has the highest concentration of single-family homes of any district in the city and is popular with foreign buyers who often pay all cash for properties they purchase.

In March, the months of supply inventory of single-family homes stood at 2.3 months, a decrease from 2.8 months of supply in March 2010. Since August 2010 when the months of supply inventory was at 4.1 months, the months of supply has fallen by 44.3 percent.

Broken down by price segment, the months of supply inventory for single-family homes priced at less than $700,000 fell by a month from 3.4 in March 2010 to 2.4 last month. For homes in the mid-price segment of the market, between $700,000 and $1.2 million, the months of supply remained steady at 2.2 months. Single-family homes priced at more than $1.2 million also saw a decrease in months of supply inventory to 2.5 months from 3 months in March 2010.

Condominium sales (which includes condominiums, lofts, stock cooperatives, and TICs) during March 2011 bolted ahead by 13.1 percent from March 2010. During the same period, the median sale price decreased slightly by 2.7 percent from March 2010 to $632,500.

According to Bruce Lyon, president of the San Francisco Association of REALTORS®, certain districts of the city saw a more dramatic increase in condominium sales than the citywide percentage, specifically, high-end Pacific Heights, the Marina, and Cow Hollow, a popular location with Gen Y-ers. The surge is attributed to incentives offered to buyers of units that have lingered on the market too long.

In March, the condominium market witnessed a surge in buying interest with pending sales rising by a spectacular 69.1 percent, compared to March of 2010. The months of supply inventory of condominiums during the month stood at 2.8 months, down from 4.1 months in March 2010.

Since September 2010, when the months of supply inventory of condominiums priced at less than $500,000 was at its highest at 9.1 months, the months of supply in this price segment has fallen by 6 months to only 3.1 months. The months of supply of condominiums priced between $500,000 and $900,000 shortened to 2.6 months from 3.5 months in March 2010, and for luxury units priced at more than $900,000, the months of supply dropped to 2.7 months from 4 months.

Lyon believes that, given these dramatic improvements in prices and sales since the beginning of the year, the local housing market recovery is underway, although 2011 could be a transition year. He attributes improved market conditions, in part, to the increase in technology jobs in the city and explains that companies like Zynga, a popular social-gaming company, are planning to substantially increase their workforces in 2011. Some analysts, he says, are predicting that tech jobs in the city will soon reach the same levels they hit at the peak of the Internet bubble in 2000.

Also contributing to the strength of the San Francisco housing market, Lyon believes, is the decline in the number of loan delinquencies. The Mortgage Bankers Association backs up his claim. According to the association, “Total delinquencies, which exclude loans in the process of foreclosure, are now at their lowest level since the end of 2008.”

“Americans still regard home ownership as the best long-term investment that a person can make,” Lyon says. In the latest Allstate/National Journal Heartland Monitor Poll, 73 percent of Americans surveyed believe that owning a home helps to achieve “the American Dream,” and 70 percent would advise a family member or close friend to buy a house to build long-term assets. Home ownership outranked retiring comfortably, graduating from college, and becoming wealthy among the factors that those surveyed believe are definitely part of achieving the American Dream. In a similar survey, conducted nationally by the Pew Research Center in Washington, 81 percent of adults in the U.S. said that buying a home is still the best long-term investment a person can make.

-Focus on Volume on Your Block, Not Median In Your City [theFrontSteps]

Escape The San Francisco Fog, Buy This Home In Sausalito

The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco,” said Mark Twain, who didn’t have the luxury of hopping in his car, heading over the Golden Gate Bridge and parking in Sausalito.

Indeed, it’s that time of year when the fog starts creeping back in, the mercury drops, the cold wind picks up off the beautiful blue ocean (now gray from the fog), and ushers in the most dreaded season in San Francisco…summer. That means, it’s time to see what else is out there, and how far you have to go to find some sun.

Today, we take a trip 10, maybe 15 minutes north of the Golden Gate Bridge Toll Plaza, and find this wonderful Sausalito home tucked into the hillside just out of reach of said fog.

Back on the market as of today, four bedrooms, two and one half baths, roughly 3400 square feet, and asking $2,350,000, who’s going to be the next to attempt to snag this Old Town Sausalito Craftsman?

To those of you readers that are reading this post anywhere east of Oakland, you might be shocked to learn that although we are, in fact, in “sunny” California, we San Franciscans suffer the wrath of the fog all summer long. (Just as our nano-markets differ by the block, so does our weather.) So when you come here on your summer vacation looking for a home or just hoping to see the sights, pack your winter coats, scarves, and ear muffs. And if summer to you means lemonade stands, shorts, bright sun and dinners on your deck, you’re gonna have to go North, South, or East, because it just doesn’t happen but maybe 10 days all summer long in San Francisco (Mission, SOMA districts excepted).

-219 West Street, Sausalito, CA-$2,350,000 [agent website]
-Focus on the Volume On Your Block, Not the Median In Your City [theFrontSteps]

From $2,500,000 To $10,000,000 In Presidio Heights At 3362 Jackson (No Joke)

Purchased for $2,500,000 in August of 2009, 3362 Jackson came back on the market April Fool’s Day 2011, and it is no joke. Currently six bedrooms, seven bathrooms, and roughly 5800 square feet of luxury, if you think this was a “quick flip”, think again.

Separate yourself for a moment from the marketing and spin to get this thing sold, watch the video, and contact me to get a look inside.

It is after all, “State of the Sexy!”

-3362 Jackson [MLS]

San Francisco Real Estate Data, Focus On The Volume On Your Block, Not The Median In Your City

“After hitting a two year low in January, the median price for single-family re-sale homes rose 18.6% in March from February. Year-over-year, the median price was off for the seventh month in a row, falling 3.1%.

After falling to their lowest level since January 2009 in February, home sales bounced back last month, which is normal for this time of year, and rose 75% from February. The 203 home sales last month were 7.7% lower than last March.”

Single Family Stats:

Condominium Stats:

One can argue the merits of medians, averages, days on market and generally just about anything in this data, and one can certainly spin it however they like. Read any number of Realtor blogs/sites and the market is gravy. Read any number of market bashing blogs and it’s all still doom and gloom. Because of this market spin that makes my head spin, I like to focus on one thing…sales volume…more specifically sales volume by district, even nano-district.

We’re coming off of a historical market thrashing. Naturally, prices are going all over the map. So what I really want to know is, if there is sales activity where my client either needs to buy or sell property. If property is moving, that is a good thing. If they’re getting stale, that is bad.

For San Francisco single family homes, we can see year over year (YoY) sales volume is down 7.7%, but up 75% compared to the month prior. Pick District 7 North (roughly Pacific Heights, Presidio Heights, Marina, Cow Hollow) and you’ll see that not only is volume up YoY (8.3%), but also up 225% on the month, whereas District 1 (roughly Richmond, Sea Cliff, Lake, Lone Mountain) is down 25% YoY, but up 50% on the month. (The fact home values in the Richmond are grouped with Sea Cliff is an entirely different nano breakdown that could further skew the numbers…ever seen a $15,000,000 home sell in the Richmond? Anyway….) In any given neighborhood, it is good that volume is up on the month (but also expected given the season), but bad that it is down on the year, because last year was a brutal year, so how could it go anywhere but up? That makes me cautiously optimistic.

For Condos we see YoY sales volume is down 7.2%, but up 28.8% on the month. That is a much more modest gain as compared to single families, and another indication that single family homes are still, and likely always will be, in more demand in San Francisco (because there are so few of them.) But look at District 5 Central (Noe Valley, Haight, Cole Valley, Glen Park…all together? Seriously?) volume is up 2.6% from last year, and 81.8% from the month prior.

The verdict? The San Francisco real estate market is both showing signs of strength, but also still many signs of weakness. You need to really take a close look at the data being presented in any articles you read (as opposed to just reading the headline and story), and you really need to figure out what the market is doing in your neighborhood, and specifically, on your block. Sales volume is (to me) most important, because it is your indication of whether properties are selling, or not. Average and median prices got pummeled, so don’t lose sleep over them. If you have to move and sell now, focus on pricing, get the highest and best price you can, and don’t stress over whether the seller 20 blocks away got more, because it could just be a result of the weather.

I’ve always said “San Francisco” data is way too generic for all of our little nano-markets, so if you have any questions about my thoughts on your ‘hood, you know where to find me.

Today, I’ll be golfing (or maybe surfing).

-San Francisco Real Estate Market Trends [ReReports.com]
-Why The Fuss About Noe Valley [theFrontSteps]
-What’s the Real Estate Forecast For Bernal Heights [theFrontSteps]
-Tour De San Francisco: Clarendon Heights [theFrontSteps]
-Factoring Weather When Buying A Home In San Francisco Is Anything But Easy [theFrontSteps]