Tag Archives: Sell My Home

21-741-18th-ave-windowview-high-res

We Just Beat The Closest Comp By $200,000

I’m pleased to announce my clients have successfully sold their Richmond District top floor condominium for $1,200,000 (listed at $949,000), or as I like to point out, $200,000 more than the most recent, closest competitor property on 26th Ave that listed almost the same day as we did.

It’s no coincidence we knocked it out of the park. It was strategy, patience, perseverance, and knowing how to finesse each offer (we received five) to their highest and best without them walking away. Congratulations to my clients that just set the bar for Central Richmond condos – the last area of the city you can still find a deal. Let the migration begin.

-741 18th Ave, Top Floor, 2+ bedroom, 1.5 bath, 2 parking, Richmond District Condo, listed $949,000, sold for $1,200,000. Seller Representation.

overbidnevada

From 32% In NOPA To 65% On Nevada – San Francisco’s Top 10 Overbids

It’s Friday, that means it’s time for the Top 10 Maximum Overbids of the week. As usual, there are some doozies, but nothing I would consider ultimate shockers like a few of the last weekly Top 10’s we’ve seen. The number one spot goes to the “Contractor’s Special” on Nevada in Bernal Heights that fetched 65% over (totally in line with market sales price, and not easy to price this type of property). The number 10 spot goes to my clients that finally won after so many years searching – 538 Baker in NOPA that was “only” 32% over asking and the winner out of 15 other offers, two of which were actually higher than ours and all cash. We had a loan. But we “won”.

Anyhow, on with the show. The Top 10 Overbids for San Francisco this past week:

Address BR/BA/Units DOM List Price Sold Price Overbid
270 Nevada St 1/1.00/N/A 14 $530,000 $876,000 65.28%
866 Cayuga Ave 4/3.00/N/A 20 $928,000 $1,380,000 48.71%
27 Day St 3/1.00/N/A 43 $895,000 $1,310,000 46.37%
1271 15th Ave 1273 4/3.50/ 13 $1,795,000 $2,550,000 42.06%
307 Parker Ave 3/2.00/N/A 13 $1,250,000 $1,710,000 36.80%
25 Miraloma Dr 3/2.00/N/A 10 $1,050,000 $1,420,000 35.24%
1150 Holloway Ave 2/1.00/N/A 35 $889,000 $1,200,000 34.98%
320 Castenada Ave 3/1.50/N/A 26 $1,695,000 $2,250,000 32.74%
471 Hickory St 2/1.00/N/A 5 $1,060,000 $1,400,000 32.08%
538 Baker 2/1.50/N/A 11 $948,000 $1,250,000 31.86%

On a side note, one of my listings will hopefully be closing today, and believe me when I say we knocked it out of the park. Will we make the Top 10? No, but maybe we’ll scratch into the Top 20.

If you’re curious what your property might sell for, give me a shout.

Have a great weekend!

-Top 20 Overbids Delivered to Your Door (Inbox) [sfnewsletter.com]
-Are Overbids A Result Of Intentional Underpricing? It’s Competitive Pricing [theFrontSteps]
-Top 20 Underbids [sfnewsletter.com]

North Bay Real Estate: The Marin, Napa & Sonoma Markets

January 2014 Market Report

The real estate market recovery started in earnest in 2012 and then went red hot in spring 2013, which resulted in an additional, big, fast jump – approximately 20% – in home prices. After the spring peak, the market calmed somewhat in the second half of the year and prices stabilized, but buyer demand remained very strong by historical standards. Economic conditions have continued to improve, household net worth has increased dramatically with rising stock and housing markets, foreclosure rates and distressed property sales have plunged, the second-home market has picked up, and interest rates, after jumping in 2013, are still relatively low. Though it is impossible to predict the future, these factors typically form the foundation of a healthy, active housing market.

In the next few weeks, new listings will start coming on market in quantity, buyers will get back in home-search mode and the market will begin to wake up after the holiday hibernation. Then we’ll start to get an inkling of what the new year has in store.

Median Sales Price Appreciation, 2011-2013

This first chart above gives an idea of the scale of the rebound in home values since the recovery began about two years ago. Median prices are affected by other factors besides changes in value, and different areas experienced bubbles and crashes (and now recoveries) of different magnitudes. Median sales prices are generalizations and changes in them should be considered very approximate indicators of appreciation, but by any measure there has been a huge recovery in North Bay real estate values.

Comparative Dollar per Square Foot Values

Continue reading

Five White-Hot Districts In A Red-Hot San Francisco Real Estate Market

July 2013 Special Report

Virtually every area of San Francisco and the Bay Area has been experiencing dramatic home-value appreciation in the past 12 to 18 months. Some that were hard hit by distressed property sales, which experienced the largest price declines, have surged in price but remain 20% – 30% below previous peak values reached in 2006 – 2008. As a state, California is still about 25% below its 2007 pre-crash median home price. And in San Francisco itself, many if not most neighborhoods now appear to have re-attained or moved slightly beyond previous high points.

But in this past quarter, a handful of neighborhoods and districts in the city have leapt well beyond the highest average home values achieved in the past. Interestingly, comparing these white-hot areas with one another, there are often huge differences in property type, era and style of construction, and neighborhood culture or ambiance. But all of them have been very affected by affluent – often newly affluent – high-tech professionals of one age group and level of affluence or another. Naturally, these neighborhoods are highly desired by other buyers too – often professionals in finance, bio-tech, medicine and law – but the high-tech-buyer dynamic has generally super-charged these markets in particular.

However, please note that the difference we’re talking about between these neighborhoods and the rest of the city is between white hot and red hot: Quite honestly, they’re all very hot markets right now.

The Inner Mission 

Super hot, super hip, generally young: this neighborhood has seen very dramatic changes since the early nineties as a classic process of gentrification occurred — changes which have recently accelerated. Houses here are often large, classic Victorians, while the condos are mostly modern, built within the last decade or so. This area has a large, vibrant and diverse commercial district centered around Mission and Valencia Streets, but is still close to Noe Valley and the Castro. This chart focuses on the condo market, in which values are approximately 15% above the previous peak.

Noe Valley – Eureka Valley (Castro) – Dolores Heights 

These neighborhoods are part of a district that includes Cole Valley, Ashbury Heights, Clarendon & Corona Heights, Duboce Triangle, Mission Dolores and Glen Park, all of which have seen enormous recent appreciation. Housing here is typically older, built in the first 4 decades of the last century; there are many parks for kids and pets; the streets are tree-lined and the ambiance of the neighborhoods is relaxed and family friendly. This district surged in popularity and price in the mid-late nineties, was one of the last to peak in value in 2008, and has been at the forefront of the market rebound which started early here, in 2011. Among other advantages, it has relatively easy access to highways south to Silicon Valley. The district also has a large condo market, but this chart focuses on house values.

South Beach & Yerba Buena 

After the Embarcadero freeway came down in 1991 and then AT&T Park built in 2000, this area changed from a place for B-class offices and car stereo installations to the home of some of the most dramatic and expensive condo and loft buildings in the country. More condos are now sold here than anyplace else in the city and high-floor units with staggering views often sell for millions of dollars – one sold for $28 million. It’s popular with a number of demographics – high-tech and bio-tech workers working in offices nearby in SoMa and Mission Bay, financial district professionals, and empty-nesters who want to enjoy city life and have all the amenities, but without the responsibility of maintaining a house. Affluent foreign buyers are also a significant segment. Its neighborhood ambiance is very urban. This chart is for condos below the price of $1,800,000, but the dynamic for ultra-luxury condos is also white hot, with an average dollar per square foot value of over $1200.

Bernal Heights 

Like Noe Valley and Glen Park, Bernal Heights was originally a blue-collar neighborhood filled with Victorian houses. Noe Valley soared in value first, becoming wildly popular, and now people who want a similar family-friendly neighborhood ambiance, but at a more affordable cost, have increasingly turned to Bernal Heights. It also has easy access to highways south to the peninsula.

 

Hayes Valley-North of Panhandle (NoPa)-Alamo Square

This condo market is made up of two totally different types: Edwardian flats that have been turned into condos and brand new, ultra-modern condo developments. The Hayes Valley commercial district is very hot and hip, similar to, but still different from the Mission’s Valencia Street. Buyers who are priced out of the nearby Cole Valley-Haight Ashbury condo market often look here for a similar neighborhood ambiance at lower cost. Hayes Valley is also close to the Civic Center cultural cluster of museum, opera, symphony, ballet and other performing arts, which appeals to another buyer demographic as well.

To put all of these charts into one simple suggestion: It’s a great time to sell your property in San Francisco, and our market desperately needs the inventory!

If you have questions or would like information regarding a neighborhood not listed above, please contact us.

What Costs How Much Where In San Francisco

A Survey of Recent San Francisco Home Sales

March-May 2013

Below are samples of recent city home sales sorted by price point. The list is not comprehensive and the sales are not necessarily representative of typical neighborhood values. In real estate, the devil is always in the details, and the short descriptions below cannot convey the many objective and subjective criteria that make up value. Still, they give an idea of what one can (or, at least could in recent months) purchase in San Francisco. 



As seen below, a large percentage of properties has been selling well over asking price: for example, in April, 90% of closed SF home listings sold, without going through any price reductions, at an average sales price 7.5% above list price. A red-hot market.

Abbreviations: BR=bedroom, BA=bath, DOM=days on market, LP=list price, sq.ft.=square foot/feet, HOA=homeowner’s association, pkg=parking space(s). Room counts do not include bathrooms, garages, storage rooms or rooms built without permit (bonus rooms): a 2 BR/2 BA home with a formal dining room, a living room and a kitchen would be considered 5 rooms. With a combined living-dining room: 4 rooms. A family room or office would count as an additional room.

Besides the sales below, maps and neighborhood values reports can be found here.
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 Over $12,000,000

$12,750,000. Pacific Heights on Jackson: the 4-level, 18-room, 7 bedroom/7.5 bath Hellman Mansion, originally designed and built by Julius Krafft in 1902; 11,500 square feet, 7 fireplaces, bay views, 2 car parking. 100 days on market (DOM), sold at 86% of original list price (LP) for $1109/square foot.

$12,375,000. Russian Hill on Francisco: 12-room, 7 BR/5.5 BA, 6050 sq.ft. mansion built in 1888; sweeping bay and city views, 4 view terraces, 2 car pkg. 70 days on market (DOM), sold at 92% of list price (LP) for $2045/sq.ft.

 

$5,000,000 – $10,000,000

$9,500,000. Presidio Heights on Presidio Terrace cul de sac: 14-room, 5 BR/6.5 BA, 1911 Beaux Arts mansion formerly the home of Mayor Alioto; 8040 sq.ft., library, home theatre. 29 days on market (DOM), 106% of list price, $1182/sq.ft.

$7,000,000. Presidio Heights on Pacific: 1951, detached, 11-room, 5 BR/4 BA, contemporary home featured on 2012 AIA Tour; 4264 sq.ft.; park, bay and GG Bridge views; roof deck; wine cellar for 800 bottles; 2 pkg. 13 DOM, 108% of LP, $1642/sq.ft.

$6,500,000. Russian Hill on Green: 3-level, 5 BR/6.5 BA, penthouse condo built in 1986; 5600 sq.ft., panoramic bay views, private elevator, 3 pkg, $1500/month HOA dues. 44 DOM, 108% of list price (LP), $1161/sq.ft.

$5,500,000. Clarendon Heights on St. Germain: 3-story, 5 BR/7 BA, modern home; views from GG Bridge to Mt. Diablo, 5701 sq.ft., elevator, deck, 2 pkg. 45 DOM, 102% of LP, $965/sq.ft.

$5,500,000. Buena Vista Park: 5-story, 21-room, 6 BR/5 BA, Arts & Crafts mansion with no parking; 6000 sq.ft., au pair quarters, deck; views of bay, city and GG bridge. 56 DOM, 100% of LP, $917/sq.ft.

 

About $3,000,000

$3,000,000. Noe Valley on 26th Street: 9-room, 4 BR/3.5 BA, custom house; 3058 sq.ft., city and bay views, 2 pkg. 6 DOM, 108% of LP, $981/sq.ft.

$3,000,000. Pacific Heights on Pacific: 2-level, 3 BR/3.5 BA, Edwardian condo; bay view, exclusive deck, music room, library, 1 pkg, $387/month HOA dues. 18 DOM, 100% of LP.

$2,995,000. Marina on Avila: 12-room, 4 BR/4 BA house built in 1925; 3025 sq.ft. + 600 sq.ft. deck, seismic upgrades, 2 pkg. 14 DOM, 109% of LP, $975/sq.ft.

$2,875,000. St. Francis Wood on Santa Clara: 1917, 4 BR/4.5 BA, detached, Spanish-Med house on double parcel; 3948 sq.ft., ocean views, 2 pkg, $4300/year HOA dues. 15 DOM, 120% of LP, $728/sq.ft.

 

About $2,500,000

$2,550,000. South Beach on 1st: 2008, 5-room, 2 BR/2 BA, high-rise condo at One Rincon; “sky-level” bridge to bridge views, 1568 sq.ft., patio, 1 pkg, $854/month HOA dues. 20 DOM, 96% of LP, $1626/sq.ft.

$2,550,000. Alamo Square on Hayes: 1891, 4-level, 11-room, 5 BR/4.5 BA Victorian with in-law apartment; 3804 sq.ft., downtown views, no parking. 0 DOM, 98% of LP, $670/sq.ft.

$2,500,000. Noe Valley on Elizabeth: 1906, 7-room, 3BR/3 BA, “contemporary” house with studio-cottage; 2178 sq.ft., deck, hot tub, 2 pkg. 0 DOM, 125% of LP, $1148/sq.ft. $2,495,000. Sea Cliff on Lake: 1921, detached, 11-room, 5 BR/3 BA, traditional home; 2860 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 22 DOM, 100% of LP, $872/sq.ft.

$2,495,000. Sea Cliff on Lake: 1921, detached, 11-room, 5 BR/3 BA, traditional home; 2860 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 22 DOM, 100% of LP, $872/sq.ft.

$2,450,000. St. Francis Wood on San Buenaventura Way: 1941, 11-room, detached, 5 BR/3 BA, traditional home; 2 pkg, $2376/year HOA dues. 26 DOM, 111% of LP.

 

About $2,000,000

$2,060,000. Cole Valley on Stanyan: 1910, 9-room, 4 BR/2 BA house — legally a 2-unit bldg; 2183 sq.ft. + bonus rooms and bath, deck, 2 pkg. 21 DOM, 122% of LP, $944/sq.ft.

$2,050,000. Dolores Park on Church: 2-level, 8-room, Art Deco, 3 BR/3 BA, penthouse TIC in 6 unit bldg; 2749 sq.ft., 3 pkg, downtown and bay views, private patio and garden, $575/month HOA dues. 34 DOM, 103% of LP, $746/sq.ft.

$2,025,000. Inner Richmond on 10th: 8-room, 4 BR/2.5 BA, 1911, detached Edwardian; 2770 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 53 DOM, 107% of LP, $731/sq.ft.

$2,007,000. Glen Park on Laidley: 3-level, 4 BR/3 BA, modern house built in 1997; 2600 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 6 DOM, 115% of LP, $772/sq.ft.

$2,000,000. Lake Street on Lake: 9-room, 4 BR/2.5 BA, 1914 Edwardian; 2784 sq.ft., 2 pkg, large deck. 19 DOM, 114% of LP, $718/sq.ft.

$1,995,000. Telegraph Hill on Francisco: 3-level, 3 BR/2.5 BA, Mediterranean-style, townhouse condo built in 1988; 2374 sq.ft., 3 terraces, bay and city views, $1971/month HOA dues, 2 pkg. 100% of LP, $840/sq.ft.

$1,950,000. Bernal Heights on Nevada: 7-room, 4 BR/3.5 BA, contemporary home; 2879 sq.ft., bay views, full floor master suite, solar heat, 2 pkg. 31 DOM, 93% of LP, $677/sq.ft.

 

About $1,750,000

$1,775,000. Financial District on Pacific: 1984, 2-level, 3 BR/3 BA condo at Golden Gateway Commons; 1850 sq.ft., 4 decks, downtown and Bay Bridge views, 1 pkg, $747/month HOA dues. 2 DOM, 100% of LP, $959/sq.ft.

$1,750,000. Lower Pacific Heights on Pine: 8-room, 2-level, 4 BR/3.5 BA, Victorian condo in 2 unit bldg; 2375 sq.ft., 1 pkg, $300/month HOA dues. 26 DOM, 100% of LP, $737/sq.ft.

$1,750,000. Pacific Heights on Green: 1988, 5-room, 2-level, 2 BR/2 BA, townhouse condo; 1560 sq.ft., large view deck, GG bridge and bay views, 1 pkg, $577/month HOA dues. 27 DOM, 97.5% of LP, $1122/sq.ft.

$1,740,000. Mt. Davidson Manor on Monterey: 1930, 7-room, detached, 4 BR/3 BA, Spanish-Med house; 2668 sq.ft., ocean views, 1 pkg. 20 DOM, 116% of LP, $652/sq.ft.

$1,700,000. Eureka Valley on Caselli: 1918, 3 BR/2 BA Edwardian; 1720 sq.ft., deck, south garden, 1 car pkg pad, plans for 1st floor expansion. 7 DOM, 122% of LP, $988/sq.ft.

 

About $1,500,000

$1,550,000. Cole Valley on Belvedere: 1907, upper unit, 2-level, 4BR/3 BA condo in 3-unit bldg; 2535 sq.ft., city and park views, 1 pkg, $300/month HOA dues. 30 DOM, 107% of LP, $611/sq.ft.

$1,515,000. South Beach on Brannan: 5-room, 2 BR/2 BA condo at The Brannan; 1602 sq.ft., city lights views, 1 pkg, 24-hour security, $977/month HOA dues. 14 DOM, 101% of LP, $946/sq.ft.

$1,505,000. Marina on Francisco: 3 BR/1.5 BA, full-floor condo built in 1923; 2 unit bldg, 1400 sq.ft., 1 pkg, $200/month HOA dues. 14 DOM, 116% of LP, $1075/sq.ft.

$1,500,000. Eureka Valley on Collingwood: 7-room, 2 BR/2 BA, contemporary house with no parking; 1850 sq.ft., downtown and bay views, deck, spa. 109% of LP, $810/sq.ft.

$1,500,000. Sherwood Forest on Casitas: 1952, 5 BR/4 BA, detached modern home; 4769 sq.ft. + basement, city and ocean views. 255 days on market, 75% of LP, $315/sq.ft.

$1,475,000. Inner Sunset on 5th: 1908, 4 BR/1.5 BA, Arts & Crafts Edwardian; 1864 sq.ft. + huge attic, deck, 1 pkg. 106% of LP, $791/sq.ft.

 

About $1,250,000

$1,275,000. Mission Dolores on Dorland: 6-room, top floor, 3 BR/1.25 BA, Edwardian condo with leased off-site parking; 1490 sq.ft., Liberty Hill views, shared yard, $660/month for HOA and pkg. 7 DOM, 116% of LP, $856/sq.ft.

$1,268,500. Inner Mission on Lexington: 2002, 6-room, top floor, 2-level, 3 BR/2.5 BA condo. 1589 sq.ft., Twin Peaks views, deck, 1 pkg, $319/month HOA dues. 15 DOM, 123% of LP, $798/sq.ft.

$1,265,000. Potrero Hill on Carolina. 1957, 7-room, 4 BR/2 BA, midcentury home; 1608 sq.ft., 1 pkg. 21 DOM, 101% of LP, $787/sq.ft.

$1,265,000. Haight Ashbury on Page: 1908, 6-room, top floor, 3 BR/1.75 BA condo in 2 unit bldg; private south deck, 1783 sq.ft., $150/month HOA. 18 DOM, 120% of LP, $709/sq.ft.

$1,260,000. Lone Mountain on Stanyan: 1937, 3 BR/1 BA, traditional house near Rossi Park; 1923 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 14 DOM, 110% of LP, $655/sq.ft.

$1,260,000. South Beach on 1st: 4-room, 2 BR/2 BA condo at The Metropolitan high-rise; panoramic views in 3 directions, 1166 sq.ft., large patio, 24-hour doorman, 1 pkg. 36 DOM, 101% of LP, $1081/sq.ft.

$1,251,000. Golden Gate Heights on 15th: 1946, 4 BR/3 BA, traditional house; 1781 sq.ft., bonus family room, ocean views, 2-tier patio, 2 pkg. 14 DOM, 126% of LP, $702/sq.ft.

$1,250,000. Central Richmond on 29th: 1936, 8-room, 4 BR/4 BA, center-patio, Spanish-Med home; 1705 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 21 DOM, 114% of LP, $733/sq.ft.

$1,235,000. SoMa on Stevenson: 2008-built, multi-level, 3 BR/3 BA, townhouse condo; 1679 sq.ft., 2 decks, 1 pkg, $402/month HOA dues. 25 DOM, 118% of LP, $736/sq.ft.

 

About $1,000,000

$950,000. Hayes Valley on Fillmore: 1981, 2 BR/2 BA condo flat in 3 unit bldg; 1500 sq.ft., 1 pkg, deck, $270/month HOA dues. 8 DOM, 119% of LP, $633/sq.ft.

$985,000. Duboce Triangle on 14th: 1907, 3 BR/2 BA, Victorian TIC flat in 3 unit bldg; 1529 sq.ft., 1 pkg, city lights view. 22 DOM, 109.5% of LP, $644/sq.ft.

$995,000. Lake Street on 2nd: 1946, 5-room, top floor, 2 BR/1 BA condo in 2 unit bldg; 1209 sq.ft., 1 pkg, $200/month HOA dues. 11 DOM, 117% of LP, $823/sq.ft.

$999,000. Yerba Buena on Folsom: 2009, 5-room, 2 BR/2 BA condo at Blu; 1230 sq.ft., den, 1 pkg, $715/month HOA dues. 23 DOM, 105% of LP, $812/sq.ft.

$1,000,000. Outer Richmond on Fulton: 1931, 7-room, 3 BR/2 BA, Marina-style house; 1950 sq.ft., 1 pkg. 30 DOM, 118% of LP, $513/sq.ft.

$1,000,000. Central Sunset on 32nd: 1939, 6-room, 3 BR/1.5 BA, center-patio house; 1815 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 21 DOM, 105% of LP, $551/sq.ft.

$1,000,000. Bernal Heights on Bonview cul de sac: 1958, 3-level, 2 BR/2 BA, contemporary house; 1700 sq.ft., deck, western views, 1 pkg. Sold off-market, $588/sq.ft.

$1,001,000. Nob Hill on Washington: 2006, 4-room, 2 BR/2 BA, contemporary flat; 978 sq.ft., 1 pkg, $485/month HOA dues. 8 DOM, 111% of LP, $1023/sq.ft.

$1,005,000. North of Panhandle (NoPa) on Hayes: 1989, 4-room, 2-level, 2 BR/2 BA, townhouse condo; 1620 sq.ft., 2 pkg, private deck, $605/month HOA dues. 41 DOM, 106% of LP, $620/sq.ft.

$1,015,000. Glen Park on Van Buren: 1913, detached, 2 BR/2 BA Edwardian with no parking; 1249 sq.ft., city and bay views, “gardener’s paradise”. 52 DOM, 107% of LP, $813/sq.ft.

 

About $800,000

$795,000. Crocker Amazon on Lowell: 1923, 6-room, 2 BR/1 BA house; 1820 sq.ft., sunroom, bonus rooms, probate sale, 2 pkg. 18 offers, 119% of LP, $437/sq.ft.

$799,000. Lower Pacific Heights on Baker: top floor, 2 BR/1 BA, Victorian condo in 2 unit bldg; 902 sq.ft. + undeveloped attic, 1 pkg, $200/month HOA dues. 40 DOM, 100% of LP, $886/sq.ft.

$800,000. Outer Sunset on 44th: 1931, 2 BR/1 BA, Spanish-Med house; 1200 sq.ft., 1 pkg, 2 bonus rooms and bath. 20 DOM, 125% of LP, $667/sq.ft. (not including bonus rooms).

$800,000. Miraloma Park on Portola: 1926, 6-room, 3 BR/1 BA, detached Tudor home; 1435 sq.ft., bonus attic room, 3 pkg. 6 DOM, 123% of LP, $557/sq.ft.

$800,000. Inner Mission on 21st: 1999, 1 BR/1.5 BA live-work loft condo; 1137 sq.ft., 1 pkg, $260/month HOA dues. 17 DOM, 114% of LP, $704/sq.ft.

$805,000. Outer Parkside on 46th: 1943, 7-room, 3 BR/2 BA house; 1432 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 7 DOM, 121% of LP, $562/sq.ft.

$806,000. Mission Terrace on Santa Rosa: 1925, 6-room, 2 BR/1 BA house; 1600 sq.ft., trust sale, bonus room, 2 pkg. 124% of LP, $504/sq.ft.

$810,000. Noe Valley on Fair Oaks: 1900, 5-room, lower level, 2 BR/1 BA flat in 2 unit condo bldg with leased parking offsite; 1184 sq.ft., $250/month HOA dues. 104% of LP, $684/sq.ft.

$810,000. Midtown Terrace on Dellbrook: 1956, 2 BR/1 BA, mid-century home; 937 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 20 DOM, 108% of LP, $864/sq.ft.

 

About $650,000

$635,000. Excelsior on Maynard: 1907, 3 BR/1 BA, Victorian cottage with no parking; 1100 sq.ft. + bonus room, seismic retrofit. 33 DOM, 116% of LP, $577/sq.ft.

$638,000. Silver Terrace on Silver: 1941, 5-room, 2 BR/1.5 BA house; 1075 sq.ft. + large bonus family room, 2 pkg. 31 DOM, 107% of LP, $593/sq.ft.

$649,000. Dogpatch on 23rd: 1 BR/1 BA live-work loft built in 2000; 1084 sq.ft., private patio, $502/month HOA dues, 1 pkg. 28 DOM, 100% of LP, $599/sq.ft.

$649,000. Pacific Heights on Washington: 2001, 1 BR/1 BA condo in high-rise Pacific Place; 745 sq.ft., Nob Hill views, 1 pkg, 24-hour security, tenant-occupied, $609/month HOA dues. 22 DOM, 100% of LP, $871/sq.ft.

$650,000. Central Richmond on 15th: lower level, Marina-style, 6-room, 2 BR/1 BA TIC flat in 2 unit bldg; 1350 sq.ft., 1 pkg, tenant occupied. 26 DOM, 108.5% of LP, $481/sq.ft.

$652,000. North of Panhandle (NoPa) on Broderick: 2007, 4-room, top floor, 1 BR/1 BA condo in mid-rise bldg; 671 sq.ft., 1 pkg, city lights view, $404/month HOA dues. 18 DOM, 109% of LP, $972/sq.ft.

$653,000. Parkside on Vicente: 1939, 4-room, 2 BR/1 BA, contemporary home; 837 sq.ft., 1 pkg. 29 DOM, 109% of LP, $780/sq.ft.

$655,000. Potrero Hill on Kansas: 2007, 4-room, 1 BR/1 BA condo at The Potrero; 804 sq.ft., downtown views, 1 pkg, $470/month HOA dues. 28 DOM, 109% of LP, $815/sq.ft.

$665,000. South Beach on King: 2007, 3-room, 1 BR/1 BA condo in high-rise; 681 sq.ft., city views, 1 pkg, $561/month HOA dues. 28 DOM, 102% of LP, $977/sq.ft.

$657,000. Sunnyside on Judson: 5-room, 2 BR/2 BA, split-level contemporary; 1226 sq.ft., 1 pkg. 31 DOM, 116% of LP, $536/sq.ft.

 

About $500,000

$485,000. Western Addition on Eddy: 1992, 2 BR/2 BA condo in low-rise bldg.; 812 sq.ft., 1 pkg, $411/month HOA dues. 124% of LP, $610/sq.ft.

$500,000. Oceanview on Minerva: 1941, 5-room, 2 BR/1 BA, contemporary house; 1030 sq.ft., sunroom, 1 pkg. 22 DOM, 116% of LP, $485/sq.ft.

$500,000. Portola on Woolsey: 1948, 5-room, 2 BR/1 BA, tunnel-entrance “fixer” house; 1250 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 17 DOM, 91% of LP, $400/sq.ft.

$500,000. Twin Peaks on Gardenside: 1975, top floor, 3-room, 1 BR/1 BA condo; 180 degree downtown and bay views, 693 sq.ft., 1 pkg, $342/month HOA dues. 117% of LP, $722/sq.ft.

$500,000. Civic Center on Van Ness: top floor, 1 BR/1 BA condo at Opera Plaza; 682 sq.ft., 1 pkg, 24-hour security, deck, $862/month for HOA dues and parking. 13 DOM, 114% of LP, $733/sq.ft.

$510,000. Bayview on Shafter: 1951, 8-room, 2 BR/1 BA home with legal 2 BR unit; 1695 sq.ft., 1 pkg. 24 DOM, 106% of LP, $301/sq.ft.

 

$300,000 – $400,000

$340,000. Visitacion Valley on Wilde: 1922, 1 BR/1 BA house; 700 sq.ft., 3 pkg. 20 DOM, 110% of LP, $486/sq.ft.

$368,000. Bayview on Rebecca Lane: 1992, 2 BR/2 BA house; bay views, deck, 1237 sq.ft., 1 pkg. 29 DOM, 108% of LP, $297/sq.ft.

$378,900. Downtown on Frank Norris Place: 1 BR/1 BA condo without parking; 522 sq.ft., south and east views, must be 55+ years old, $367/month HOA dues. 25 DOM, 100% of LP, $726/sq.ft.

$380,000. Downtown on O’Farrell: top floor, studio condo at The Hamilton; 480 sq.ft., huge south and east views, tenant occupied, $574/month HOA dues + $250/month for parking. 34 DOM, 100% of LP, $792/sq.ft.

$385,000. Diamond Heights on Red Rock Way: 1972, studio condo with 1 car pkg; 592 sq.ft., $407/month HOA dues. 129% of LP, $650/sq.ft.

 

Dollar per Square Foot ($/sq.ft.) is based upon the home’s interior living space and should not include garages, unfinished attics and basements, rooms built without permit, outdoor space, patios and decks-though all these can still add value. These figures are usually derived from appraisals or tax records, but are sometimes measured in different ways, unreliable or unreported altogether. All things being equal, a house will sell for a higher dollar per square foot than a condo (due to land value), a condo higher than a TIC (quality of title), and a TIC higher than a multi-unit building (quality of use). All things being equal, a smaller home will sell for a lower sales price, but a higher dollar per square foot than a larger one. However, with our enormous variety in property types, all things are rarely equal in San Francisco real estate. There are often huge variations of value within a single neighborhood: the specific location, property condition, architectural style and curb appeal, amenities, parking, views, lot size & outdoor space all affect dollar per square foot values. Typically, the highest figures in San Francisco are achieved by penthouse condos with utterly spectacular views in prestige, doorman buildings, and by mansions in the absolute best locations of the most prestigious neighborhoods-more often than not, they too will have great views.

 

How these sales apply to the value of any particular property is unknown without a specific comparative market analysis.