Tag Archives: market

Are Overbids A Result Of Intentional Underpricing? No – It’s Competitive Pricing

It’s happened again – I did a post Friday about the week’s overbids, and the comments and emails immediately come in, “Is this because the owners are listing for under market prices to crest bidding wars?” or “Why do you always highlight overbids? Aren’t these properties underpriced to begin with?” or “These properties are selling at market price, so why all the hype about overbids?” or “Can you post comps for each overbid you show?”

It’s nonstop, so let me elaborate. The answer is no, most of these overbids are not underpriced, and no, most listings are not intentionally underpriced*. Most properties are “competitively” priced. In a market where buyer activity drives property values up, we have learned (this isn’t San Francisco’s first crazy real estate rodeo) it is best to price a property lower than where you expect it will sell, get a lot of people through the door, and let the buyers set the new market price for any particular property. It is the best way to get the highest price for the seller. The truth is, in this market, we listing agents have run out of crystal balls and simply don’t know what true market value of a property is until you open it up to the hordes of buyers out there, and let them do their thing.

Additionally, buyers have become accustomed to looking at property priced lower than what they expect to pay in the end. So if you list higher than what they’re searching, you won’t get them through the door. For example, a buyer that is expecting to pay $1.2M on a property is likely looking at properties priced well below that (in the $800-995,000 range), knowing they have to bid over. It’s mean, and totally wrong, but it is the way it is. If you bring a property to market at the higher price you hope to achieve, you might get less buyers through the door, no offers in the end, and end up “chasing the market down”, which is not a fun thing.

The last three listings I had blew our (mine and my clients’) minds. We had expectations as to where they might sell, and even entertained the idea of an off market sale, but man were we glad we didn’t go that route. In each situation we received at least 10% more than what we originally thought was “market value”. Did we intentionally price it low? No. We really didn’t know exactly where it would end up selling, so we priced it competitively knowing the buyers will set the market price, and they did, and always do.

It’s frustrating being a buyer in this market, no doubt, but it’s stressful being a seller too. Selling a property for an exorbitant amount of money, regardless of how much over asking an offer might be, is not entirely relaxing. Appraisers strike the fear of God in sellers, because each new appraisal is at a level not yet seen. Hence the draw of accepting cash offers over those with loans. Miraculously appraisals keep coming in at value, but sometimes other things can derail the process too, and then what? Re-list? List at higher price? Are the same buyers still out there? Will you get that magical (through the roof) number again? Do you put the backup offer in (if they’re still there)? So many variables cause so much stress, but that’s another topic altogether.

The bottom line is the overbids that are highlighted here and make headlines are not so much about property being underpriced, as much as they are about the multitude of buyers out there willing to go to astronomical heights to realize their dream of owning property in San Francisco. Arm chair analytics are great for SocketSite, not so great for listing your home on the market, or trying to be the lucky buyer that wins in a market with far too little supply, and over-flowing demand.

So take these overbids with a grain of salt, and if MLS was smart, they’d add a category when reporting sales that will show us all the number of offers on any given property and any given overbid. That’s the real stat to focus on. For every property that gets sold there are usually 10-15 buyers (at least) that just lost and are moving on to the next one, and ready to go crazy big just to be done with it.

I hope that sheds a little light on the matter, and I hope it clears up the air around most of us real estate agents that are simply doing what it takes to get the seller the highest and best price for their property. It’s a bit of a game, but if you know how to play, you can win. As always, I’m here to help you buy and sell, because I do know the game, and I do know how to win.

*Some agents do intentionally underprice property, and some agents do use this as a way to brag about getting “$$$ over asking on my latest listing, I can do the same for you.” But those agents are the exception, not the rule, and you should avoid them.

-Last Week’s Top 10 Real Estate Overbids-San Francisco [theFrontSteps]

San Francisco… You So Bad Ass!

From the San Francisco Association of Realtors:

Scarcity of Defaults Demonstrates Enduring Value of San Francisco Real Estate

Of all U.S. mortgage holders, about one quarter, or 11.3 million households, is underwater, meaning they owe more than their homes are worth. In California, the percentage is even greater—35 percent.

According to First American CoreLogic, the tipping point appears to come when a home owner has a negative equity of 25 percent or more. At that point, many owners choose to cut their losses and voluntarily walk away from their homes. To prevent this result and to avoid a costly and time-consuming foreclosure, banks typically encourage owners to market their property as a short sale.

So, how does San Francisco and the northern peninsula stack up against the rest of the country, and the State as a whole? These areas are doing much better. The percentage of home owners underwater in the San Francisco-San Mateo-Redwood City area is only 10.4 percent. And the percentage of home owners underwater by 25 percent or more is only 2.6 percent.

Real estate sales in San Francisco and the northern peninsula may be lagging previous years but real estate values have remained strong through one of the worst economic downturns since the Great Depression—a fact of which homeowners and prospective buyers should be reminded from time to time.

“San Francisco Housing Market Continues To Strengthen”

This pulled directly from the San Francisco Association of Realtors Newsletter:

San Francisco’s Housing Market Continues to Strengthen Unlike Many Other Areas of the Country

Falling inventory levels and strong sales activity in December, 2009, helped to drive continued improvement in San Francisco’s housing market, according to the latest Market Focus report issued jointly by Rosen Consulting Group and the San Francisco Association of REALTORS®. The median single-family home sales price increased for a third consecutive month in December reaching $755,608. That represents a 7.9 percent increase from December, 2008. The report attributes the improved market conditions to a drop off in foreclosure sales and a growing proportion of sales in higher priced neighborhoods.

Median Condominium Sales Price Increases for First Time Since July 2008

The report observes that the condominium market also seems to have turned a corner, as the median sales price increased by 7.6 percent to $672,590 in December. It was the first year-over-year increase since July 2008.

According to John Lee, president of the San Francisco, “The reduction in asking prices, mortgage rates of less than or near 5 percent and federal tax incentives have increased housing affordability and attracted buyers to the condominium market.” But he notes that “sellers of higher-priced properties have benefitted less from incentives as sales are closed only after significant negotiations from original asking prices.”

Closed and Pending Sales Activity in December Remained Relatively Strong

As expected, closed and pending sales activity dipped during December as a result of seasonal patterns. But despite the slowdown, closed and pending single-family sales activity that month outpaced similar activity in December of both 2008 and 2007.

According to the report, the single-family months of supply inventory fell to 3 months in December 2009 from 5.8 months in December 2008. The condominium months of supply inventory fared less well dropping to 4 months from 7.2 months during the same period. With inventory levels falling, Lee anticipates that the price increases seen in recent months will continue and possibly intensify.

The Rosen Consulting Group sounds a note of caution in its report by saying that a number of factors could delay the further strengthening of San Francisco’s housing market. Principal among these would be an increase in distressed properties that would add to the for sale inventory and put downward pressure on prices and the anticipated increase in mortgage rates that could rein in home buying activity. But the Group’s outlook is increasingly positive and it believes that if these eventualities would happen, “it would only be a bump in the road to long term growth in the San Francisco market.”

Ask Us: Why The Fuss About Noe Valley?

Where readers ask, and we (the community) try to answer:

The Front Steps really concentrates on Noe. I live in Noe and understand the attraction and the desirability of neighborhood but I’m not exactly sure why it is the barometer for everywhere else. Can you shed any light on this?

Good question. It’s not that we set out to focus on Noe, in fact we think focusing on an area that is much more hip (like Mission, Dog Patch, or NoPa) would serve our readers better and certainly be a helluva lot more fun, but looking at the real estate in Noe Valley is a very good barometer for the well being of the entire city’s real estate market, because it is considered an A+ location with generally financially and employment secure residents. Noe Valley is one of the most desirable and popular areas to live in San Francisco, and if the market in Noe Valley crashes, the rest of the city should watch out. SOMA is tanking as we speak, but it has nothing to do with Noe Valley. It is a totally different market.

As you’ve also likely noticed, a lot of the content we post comes in as “tips” from readers and our readers that send tips must be a bit more concerned with Noe. So feel free to tell your friends that live in other nabes to check us out and send in tips about their hood as well. It doesn’t have to be about real estate, but it does have to be about San Francisco (or at least the greater Bay Area.)

Thanks for reading!

Who’s Yo Data!? San Francisco Real Estate Market Statistics Galore

We’re feeding your addiction:

-2 years, Supply Demand Single Family Residence San Francisco
-2 years, Supply Demand Condo SF
-2 years, Sales Rate SFR and Condo/Loft SF
-2 years, Sales Rate SFR SF
-2 years, Sales Rate Condo SF
-2 years, Median Price SFR and Condo SF
-2 years, Median Price, SFR SF
-2 years, Median Price, Condo SF
-2 years, Supply Demand SFR Condo, SF

Don’t know your San Francisco Real Estate Districts? Fear not, Follow this link to be enlightened. This link is always available in our “sites of interest” should you forget to bookmark the page.

Everything on this post pulled directly from the San Francisco Association of Realtors Advantage Online.