San Francisco Is The Best City, Has The Most College Educated People, Oldest Women, And Most Homeless People, And Lots Of Fog…What Else?

By the numbers: San Francisco has an estimated population of 837,442 (per U.S. Census), we live within 47 square miles, our calves are bursting out of our jeans, and who needs squats (we have hills…apparently 43 – 50 “named” hills). We have a ton of billionaires, and even more homeless. We have old ladies, and lots of lawyers. But really, have a look at the rest.

San Francisco is:

  • America’s best city, per Bloomberg Businessweek
  • 2nd best metro area in the country for resident “well-being” (after San Jose-Santa Clara), per 2014 Gallup/Healthways survey
  • America’s most pretentious city (followed by NYC, Boston & Minneapolis), per Travel + Leisure reader survey
  • 1st in college degrees per square mile: 7031, per U.S. Census; 3rd in graduate degrees per capita (after DC and Seattle), per Forbes
  • 3rd worst metro area commute (after DC and LA): average of 61 hours of delay in traffic per year, per Texas A&M Transportation Institute
  • 5th best city for dogs, per PawNation; est. 120,000 dogs live in SF, per City Govt.
  • Last in children per capita (14%); approx. 113,000 children under 18, per U.S. Census
  • 3rd in lawyers per capita by metro area (after DC & NYC); 2nd highest mean wage for lawyers, $169,000 (after San Jose), per Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • 3rd in number of billionaires (i.e. the Bay Area, after Moscow and New York): 65 billionaires (25 in SF), though it fluctuates depending on stock prices, per SFLuxe
  • 1st in homeless residents per capita, per Philanthropedia; percentage living below poverty level, 13.2%, per U.S. Census
  • 14th largest city in the U.S.; 2nd most densely populated city in the U.S. (after NYC)
  • Misc. Fact – Estimated change in population since 2010: 32,000, per U.S. Census; new housing units added since 2010: approx. 4200, per SF Planning Dept.
  • Highest median asking residential rent in U.S.: $3256/month, per livelovely.com; 4th least affordable city by median-rent-to-median-income ratio – 40.7%, per Zillow
  • 186th on Best Drivers List, per Allstate
  • 11th most gay friendly city, per The Advocate 2014 ranking; 1st in LGBT percentage of residents, 15.4%, and 4th by total population, per Census Bureau
  • 6th highest rate of vehicle theft, per Natl. Insurance Crime Bureau; 5400/year stolen in SF & 28,500 in Bay Area, with 85-90% recovered, per Bay Area News Group
  • Misc. Fact – Every year, approx. 70,000 cars are towed ($500+ fee) & 1,529,000 tickets issued in San Francisco, per Towing & Recovery & SFMTA
  • 2nd in “walkability” (after NYC), per WalkScore
  • 8th most bike-friendly city (Portland is 1st), per Bicycling Magazine
  • 3rd best city to visit in the U.S. (after NYC and Chicago), per Traveler’s Choice Destination Awards and Condé Nast Readers’ Choice
  • Greenest city in North America, per The Economist; 2nd greenest city in the world (after Reykjavik), per Green Uptown
  • Bay Area is 1st in hybrid and electric car sales: 9.4% of all sales are hybrid; .52% of sales are electric, per R.L. Polk & Co.
  • 2nd fittest city in the U.S. (after Portland), per Men’s Fitness
  • 1st in women’s life expectancy: 84.5 years; 2nd in women’s well-being (after DC), per Measure of America
  • 2nd smartest city in the U.S. (after Seattle; tied with Boston), per Co.Exist; approx. 35 Nobel Prize winners live in the Bay Area, per SF Business Times
  • 4th most liberal major city in the U.S. (Oakland is #3), per Center for Voting Research. If smaller cities are included, Berkeley comes in 3rd, Oakland 5th and SF 9th
  • Best city for dining out, per Bon Appétit readers’ poll; best for ethnic food dining, per Travel + Leisure; most restaurants per capita, per Frommer’s
  • 10th on the Global Financial Centres Index; 3rd in U.S. (after NYC and Boston)
  • 15th best city for hippies (Eugene is #1 and Berkeley is #8), per Estately Blog
  • 2nd in Fortune 500 companies: 31, with recent addition of Facebook (ranking refers to Bay Area; NYC metro area is 1st with 66), per Fortune
  • 194th in cost of doing business, per Forbes
  • Misc. Fact – Avg. SF internet download speed: 22.2 Mbps vs. U.S. average of 22.9; Kansas City is at 86.3 Mbps; Provo at 84.9; NYC at 31; Austin at 27.2, per Ookla
  • SF population breakdown: 42% non-Hispanic white (vs. 64% U.S.), 34% Asian (vs. 5% U.S.), 15% Hispanic/Latino (vs. 16%), 6% black (vs. 13%), 1% Native American (n/c), .5% Pacific Islander (.2%), per U.S. Census
  • 4th in percentage of foreign-born residents: 30% for SF-Oakland metro area; 36% for SF alone (behind Miami, San Jose-Santa Clara and LA), per U.S. Census
  • Misc. Fact – Highest minimum wage in the country: $10.74/hour as of January 2014 (with a ballot measure to raise it to $15 expected in November)
  • 21st highest office rent in the world & 4th highest in U.S. (after NY Midtown, DC East End, Boston Back Bay): SF Financial District, $70/sq.ft./year, per Cushman Wakefield
  • 8th best city for drinking, per Forbes
  • 13th highest rate of consumer cell phone loss or theft (35%), per Symantec; more than 50% of SF robberies involve the theft of a mobile device, per SF Police Dept.
  • 3rd most inventive city in the world by patent applications per capita (after Eindhoven in the Netherlands and San Diego), per the OECD
  • 3rd best city for parks in U.S. (after Minneapolis and NYC), 5384 acres equaling 18% of the city’s area, per Trust for Public Land
  • 3rd in U.S. for number of “ultra-high-net-worth” individuals worth $30m+ (after NYC and LA), per Wealth-X; 10% of wealthiest Americans live in Bay Area, per SFLuxe
  • Highest median home price, per National Association of Realtors: $960,000, 1st quarter 2014, per SFARMLS; homeownership rate is 37% vs. 65% for U.S., per Census Bureau
  • 33rd most visited city in the world, per Euromonitor Intl.; 16.9 million visitors in 2013 (or 20 visitors per resident)
  • Misc. Fact – the Bay Area has 2 universities in the top-ranked 6 of the world: Stanford, UC Berkeley; 3 in the top 31 (add UCSF), per Times Higher Education Ranking report
  • 1st in the U.S. for real estate investment/development opportunity, per Urban Land Inst.
  • 2nd most charitable city (after Seattle), per Daily Beast; 8th most generous in online giving, per Convio; as a multi-county metro area, 310th in percentage of adjusted gross income donated (2.8%), per National Center for Charitable Statistics
  • 9th “coolest” city in the U.S., per Forbes (Houston, DC and LA were 1, 2 & 3)
  • Misc. Fact – Average number of foggy days per year: 108, per Current Results
  • Best city for Halloween trick or treating, per Zillow
  • That ought to keep you all discussing for a while.

    Prices Jumping – Yet Again – Across San Francisco

    The San Francisco real estate market grew increasingly frenzied as the first quarter of 2014 progressed, leading to another surge in home prices in virtually every neighborhood in the city. The high-demand/ extremely-low-inventory/ competitive-bidding situation is similar to what occurred first in spring 2012 and then, to an even higher degree, in spring 2013. After the market seemed to stabilize in the second half of last year, we didn’t expect to see it turn this fierce in early 2014, but right now it appears to be every bit as ferocious as last spring’s.

    Of major metro areas, the new Gallup-Healthways survey ranked SF-Oakland second in the nation (behind San Jose-Santa Clara) on their index for “well-being.” Though already the second most densely populated city in the country (after NYC), San Francisco simply has many more people wanting to live here than there are homes available to rent or buy.

    Sales over Asking Price
    The heated competition for new listings coming on market has resulted in an astounding percentage of sales occurring above, and often far above, list price.

    This chart below breaks down, by neighborhood, the average sales price to list price percentage for the 90% of homes selling without price reductions. Of the areas assessed, Bernal Heights came out on top with sales prices averaging an incredible 21% over list prices over the past 2 months.



    Median Sales Price Spikes
    Typically, the first quarter of the year does not show a dramatic increase in median sales prices over the previous quarter – in fact, a decline is not unusual due to holiday market dynamics. But the first quarter of 2014 saw large spikes in median prices for both single family homes (houses) and, especially, condos in San Francisco.
    This next chart is a look at quarterly median price appreciation over the past 3 years.



    Longer-term trends: While virtually the whole country has been experiencing a large market rebound, San Francisco, because of our particular economic circumstances, is generally outperforming almost every other market area. The big exception is Silicon Valley, whose high appreciation rate is being driven by many of the same employment and demographic causes.



    Far Too Little Inventory
    When the market recovery began in earnest in early 2012, there were complaints of a shortage in inventory. In 2013, the market grew even more heated and supply declined further to what felt like desperately low levels. Now in 2014, amid no lessening of demand that we perceive, the supply of SF homes available to purchase has dropped again.

    There are increasing numbers of new-construction housing units coming on market – and many more being planned and built – but so far they’re being snapped up, at very high prices, without noticeably altering the supply and demand dynamic.



    Listings Selling Faster than Ever



    San Francisco Neighborhood Snapshots
    We updated analyses for a number of city neighborhoods with enough sales for quarterly data to be meaningful. In every district we looked at, there were significant spikes in median sales prices and/or average dollar per square foot values in the quarter just ended.
    Below are two samples, but our full collection of long-term neighborhood analyses can be found here (some updated through the first quarter, others through the end of 2013):San Francisco Neighborhood Values







    Affordability by Neighborhood
    We broke the city down by neighborhood according to the number of house and condo sales in each price segment. Of course, in a generally appreciating market, these prices continue to move upward en masse. Below are 3 analyses from our 11-chart report, which can be found in its entirety here:Where Can I Afford to Buy in San Francisco






    Please call or email if you have any questions or comments regarding these analyses.

    Fluctuations in median and average sales prices and average dollar per square foot values are not unusual and these fluctuations can occur for other reasons besides changes in value, such as seasonality, inventory available to purchase, buyer profile and new condo development projects coming on market. How these statistics apply to any particular property is unknown without a specific comparative market analysis. All data from sources deemed reliable, but may contain errors and is subject to revision.

    How Much Is My Home Worth?

    “How much is my property worth?” “How much could we get for our place?” “How much do you think my condo would sell for?”

    San Francisco Median Home Price Graph, What Is My Home Worth

    I get asked different variations of this question every single day, everywhere I go. It doesn’t matter if I’m at a dinner party, bbq, school event, or even on a field trip with my 7 year old. It’s okay. It’s totally normal. Everybody wants to chat real estate. It’s why I started this blog, and it’s a go-to if conversation about Blue Bottle versus Ritual Roasters gets so heated it’d be better left settled in the Octagon. Everybody wants to know if their home value has gone up, and everybody wants free information about the market and their property. So how does a real estate professional accurately answer this question in a market where (currently) home values seem to be going nowhere but up every week, and every new sale sets a new high water mark in your area?

    The answer is this, nobody REALLY knows. A couple things I do know are Zillow Zestimates do you no good in San Francisco, your property is worth more than your cousin’s in Kansas, and your property could be worth more than it ever was. I know what comparable properties have recently sold for, and I know how I can help you market, show, and price your property to get the maximum number of people through the door in an effort to let the market dictate what is the maximum value your property is worth.
    Continue reading

    DECEMBER 2013 SAN FRANCISCO CONDOMINIUM PRICES INCREASE 18 PERCENT OVER PREVIOUS YEAR

    San Francisco condominium prices rose 18 percent in December 2013 over the previous year, according to the Condominium Pricing Index released today by The Mark Company, a leading urban residential marketing and sales firm.

    The Mark Company Condominium Pricing Index for December was $1,034 per square foot, which is up 2 percent from November. New construction inventory was 78 percent lower than a year ago, and down 26 percent from the previous month, with 92 units currently available.

    “With fewer than 100 new condominiums now for sale in San Francisco, price appreciation is likely to continue in 2014,” states Erin Kennelly, senior director of research, The Mark Company.

    The Condominium Pricing Index, part of the firm’s monthly Trend Sheet (available at www.themarkcompany.com), represents the price per square foot of a new 10th floor, 1,000-square-foot condominium. It is based on recent sales data, and uses a proprietary quantitative method to measure trends in market demand. It tracks the value of a new construction condominium without the volatility of inventory changes.

    The Mark Company Penthouse Pricing Index, which applies the same methodology to a new 30th floor, 2,000-square-foot condominium, was $1,776 per square foot, up 18 percent year over year.

    The condominium price per square foot was $868 for resales, up 26 percent over December 2012, according to The Mark Company Trend Sheet for San Francisco. In addition, there were 229 condominium resales in San Francisco in December, 134 active condominium listings representing less than one month of inventory, and 123 pending condominium units, the Trend Sheet found.

    That’s some pretty insane growth and is not surprising. Thanks Mark Company for the info.

    Dropping Knowledge: San Francisco Property Pie Chart

    I know you’re all like me, you drive around town looking at all the wonderful, insanely expensive property we have here in San Francisco. I know you wish you knew how many of the properties you see were single family homes, how many are condominiums, how many are big ol’ properties of which you’d love to be the landlord (or maybe you already are). My company came up with this nice little pie chart for all y’all. Enjoy:

    sf_housing_units

    San Francisco Drug Dealing, Violent and Property Crimes…All In One Map

    Zoom in, zoom out, click here, click there. Sort by day or night, by area or population. Get down and dirty with recent (and past) crimes committed in your area, or an area you plan on living. Find out what crimes were committed, when, and exactly where. It’s exactly these types of maps that could very well set your mind at ease, or send you running to the suburbs. They certainly do provide a fair bit of education, that’s for sure.

    Spoiler alert: Tenderloin wins with the most crimes per square mile, per year, than any other part of the city! (Are you really surprised?)

    crimemapcity

    It would appear the Outer Sunset is the safest part of town, and it would also appear if you plan on visiting the Cliff House or walk Land’s End trail, you should either not take your car, or not take your car…there is an incredibly high rate of car break ins there. Not too surprising if you consider the number of tourists in that area leaving valuables and luggage clearly visible in their rental car. Anyway, enjoy, and thanks to the developer of this fine map for introducing me, and you, to it.

    -CityCrimeMaps.com
    -Outer Sunset [theFrontSteps]

    Penthouses, Mansions, Short Sales & Fixer-Uppers

    What Did San Francisco Homebuyers Buy in 2013?

    Views, prices, architecture, neighborhoods, property types and sizes, parking, probate sales and appreciation rates: We data-mined all of San Francisco’s 2013 sales reported to MLS through the end of November and charted the results below.

    Please call or email with any questions or comments.

    Sales as described in and reported to San Francisco MLS by 11/25/13. All data herein is from sources deemed (at least somewhat) reliable — i.e. the information input by listing agents regarding their own listings — but may contain errors and is subject to revision. These charts do not include sales unreported to MLS, such as the sale of many so-called “pocket listings” and many of the new-development condo sales that occur.

    Maximum Overbid Monday!

    Well now that we have the government shutdown (temporarily) behind us, let’s get back to the market at hand. It would appear there is a bit of a calm washing over our waters, but open house activity is still through the roof, so we might indeed be stuck in this craziness for a while. Case in point, San Francisco’s most recent Top 10 Overbids.

    Rank| Address | Property Type | Bed/Bath | DOM | Asking Price | Sale Price | % Over

    #1-709 York St: Single-Family; 2/2.00; 10 DOM; $799,000; $1,150,000; 43.93%
    #2-152 Hancock St: 2-4 Units; 26 DOM; $1,100,000; $1,557,000; 41.55%
    #3-82 Peralta Ave: Single-Family; 3/2.00; 28 DOM; $998,000, $1,380,000; 38.28%
    #4-514 Precita Ave: Single-Family; 2/1.00; 11 DOM; $925,000; $1,255,000, 35.68%
    #5-130 Randall St: Single-Family; 3/1.50; 7 DOM; $1,195,000; $1,575,000; 31.80%
    #6-3901 17th St: 5+ Units; 28 DOM; $2,300,000; $3,025,000; 31.52%
    #7-327 Richland Ave: Single-Family; 3/1.00; 35 DOM; $749,000; $980,000; 30.84%
    #8-515 Powhattan St: Single-Family; 2/1.00; 13 DOM; $708,000; $925,000; 30.65%
    #9-4430 Cabrillo St: 2-4 Units; 14 DOM; $925,000; $1,200,000; 29.73%
    #10- 1108 Cabrillo St: Single-Family; 3/1.50; 11 DOM; $1,295,000; $1,677,000; 29.50%

    [Copyright ©2013 TheGoods-SF.com. Visit www.thegoods-sf.com for more information. Data feed from SFAR MLS deemed accurate but not guaranteed.]

    This data set reflects properties that got into contract on average 30+ days ago, so it will be interesting to see how this continues. We look forward to providing this information to you every Monday, now that the Goods has made it easy for us to share it, so come on back!

    What Your Realtor Should Really Be Sending You…The Goods

    I am pleased to announce the launch, and early adoption by Paragon Real Estate Group, of the newest addition to the San Francisco real estate scene “The Goods“, real estate marketing made simple.

    The goal of this new offering is to make it easy for real estate agents in the San Francisco/Bay Area to provide their clients with what they need, and should expect, from their agent…time sensitive, factual, market data that pertains to the area in which their property is located, or the area where they would like to be. We’d like to put an end to unnecessary print marketing (think of the trees!), stop the sending of mugshot branded magnets, notepads, Zagat Guides, coffee mugs, and all the other crap clients don’t need, or necessarily want from their real estate agent. Keep in front of your clients with valuable real-time market data they can use.

    The Goods will provide your company with a new link every two weeks to newly listed, as well as recently sold property data your clients can browse by location, property type, price, beds, baths and DOM. You can include the link in your marketing pieces, and also receive a raw html snippet/preview of the data to include in your marketing, inviting your clients to click through and track sales in their area.

    Paragon Real Estate Group is the first to adopt and use this great new product for their agents’ clients, and positive feedback is already rolling in.

    -The Goods is a terrific tool for our agents to deliver to our clients: It’s fast and easy to use and it provides our clients with extremely timely and valuable information about new listings and what’s selling in the market, which is at the top of the list of resources our clients want most from us. -Patrick Carlisle, Chief Marketing Analyst, Director of Business Development, Paragon Real Estate Group

    Here is a sample of how Paragon incorporates it into their marketing. You’ll notice they call it “Market Watch”. You can call it whatever you like.
    ParagonMarketWatch

    In this age of Zillow, Trulia, Redfin, and the countless apps hitting the market which afford your clients the luxury of tracking the market without your help, you can’t afford to let this opportunity slip you by. Brokers of every company in the Bay Area should be jumping on this offering, as simply put…it’s a no-brainer.

    For more information about The Goods, visit www.theGoods-SF.com.

    Home Ownership as an Investment, Home Prices, Inflation, Leverage & Home Equity

    First and foremost, any home purchased needs to work as a home: it fulfills your housing needs at an affordable monthly cost – ideally, a cost, after tax deductions and principal pay-down, less than or similar to that of renting the property. However, though it cannot be compared on an apples-to-apples basis to investments such as stocks, bonds and CDs (that you don’t live in), it’s worth looking at the issue of homeownership as a financial investment as well.

    Home-Price Appreciation vs. CPI Inflation since 1988

    This chart compares, over 25 years, the amount of inflation per the Consumer Price Index (CPI) to price appreciation for high-price-tier homes in the 5-county San Francisco Metro Area per the Case-Shiller Index. (Most of the City of San Francisco’s housing is in the high-price tier, the upper third of Bay Area unit sales.) In this chart, 1988 equals a price-value of 100; 127 equals a price 27% higher than the price in 1988 for the same goods or house. CPI inflation is relatively slow and steady: the average across the past 25 years is a little less than 3% per year. Home prices, however, jump dramatically up (appreciation) and down (depreciation) depending on the market cycle, but average appreciation from 1988 to mid-2013 was about 5% per year – though this calculation can vary greatly by the exact start and end dates chosen.

    An average SF Metro Area home purchased in 1988 appreciated by 244% as of July 2013, while the overall CPI inflation rate was 97%. If the home had been sold at the recent bottom of the market, the difference would have narrowed to 165% appreciation vs. 95% inflation. Purchase and sell timing always matters and if one has to sell at the bottom of the market, it affects the return on any investment. As the chart illustrates, home-price appreciation usually outpaces inflation by a significant margin over the longer term: this is a good thing for homeowners and doesn’t include other benefits such as living in the property and the capital gains exclusion on the sale of a principal residence.

    This analysis applies well to homes purchased with all cash and no financing. Leverage alters the picture substantially.

    Leverage (Financing), Inflation and Home Equity Growth

    If one leverages one’s home purchase by taking out a loan, then the growth in one’s home equity dramatically outpaces inflation over the longer term. For the sake of simplicity, in the example above, we’ll assume that home price appreciation and inflation both run at 3% per year, and that the buyer put down 20% in cash plus closing costs, and financed the remaining 80% with a 30-year fixed rate loan. In this scenario, each year that the inflation/ home appreciation rate is 3%, one’s home equity asset grows by about 15%, plus the principal repayment on the outstanding loan (which is a major component – like a forced savings account – in the growth of equity over time). Indeed, the higher the inflation rate, the greater the equity growth. If home price appreciation outpaces inflation as well – as it has over the past 25 years – that accelerates the increase in home equity further. Moreover, the financing cost is currently subsidized by the mortgage interest tax deduction, if that applies to your financial situation.

    This is why, using reasonable leverage, real estate is typically considered a good long-term investment – short-term can be much riskier – as well as an excellent hedge against inflation. Of course, if leverage is abused as it was in the years of subprime lending, underwriting standards decline, predatory lending and home-refinancing frenzy (i.e. “using one’s home as a piggy bank”), other risks arise.

    In earlier times, when people didn’t move around as much, one bought one’s home, paid it off over the years and when retirement came, had a home owned free and clear – a huge financial asset to be used as appropriate.

    Ongoing Homeownership Costs vs. Rental Costs over Time


    In this chart, the increase in the annual cost of homeownership with a fixed-rate loan is compared with the increase in rent at a 3% inflation rate, and the increase in rent of a home subject to San Francisco rent control, where annual rent increases are limited to 60% of CPI. As seen, if one locks in a fixed mortgage interest rate, the increase in ownership cost is limited to the increase in property tax costs (limited under Prop 13) and maintenance expenses, while the entire rental cost may be subject to annual raises. Over the longer term, one’s ownership costs become more and more attractive when compared to rental housing costs subject to inflation. If one owned the home for the full 30-year loan period, the monthly mortgage payment itself would disappear.

    We have generated two sample rent vs. buy scenarios for San Francisco here:

    2-BR Apartment Rental vs. Condo Purchase and 3-BR House Rental vs. Purchase

    And you can perform your own rent vs. buy scenario calculations here, using your own financial circumstances, assumptions and projections: Rent vs. Buy Calculator

    Important caveats: Trying to compare buying a home to other financial investments on an apples-to-apples basis is impossible, because there are so many other variables at play: the use and enjoyment of the home, how the cost of homeownership compares to renting, physical condition decline over time (without further investment), risks and returns on other types of investments, home tax deductions, the capital gains exclusion on profit from a principal residence sale ($250k for single owner/ $500k for couple), market timing and other factors. All the analyses above are simply sample scenarios, looking at homeownership from a number of angles using a variety of assumptions. It is unknown whether they will apply to future trends.

    As said in the first line of this report, first and foremost, any home purchased needs to work as a home: it fulfills your housing needs at an affordable monthly cost. If that’s where you start, with a fixed rate loan, and you don’t refinance out growing home equity, and you don’t have to sell during a market downturn (which, admittedly, isn’t always possible to avoid), then you should come out all right and more often, very well.

    These analyses were performed in good faith, but may contain errors, are not warranted and should not be exclusively relied upon. Tax law and other factors referred to are subject to change. All information provided herein should be carefully reviewed according to your own circumstances, plans and economic projections with a qualified financial adviser and loan agent.

    Five White-Hot Districts In A Red-Hot San Francisco Real Estate Market

    July 2013 Special Report

    Virtually every area of San Francisco and the Bay Area has been experiencing dramatic home-value appreciation in the past 12 to 18 months. Some that were hard hit by distressed property sales, which experienced the largest price declines, have surged in price but remain 20% – 30% below previous peak values reached in 2006 – 2008. As a state, California is still about 25% below its 2007 pre-crash median home price. And in San Francisco itself, many if not most neighborhoods now appear to have re-attained or moved slightly beyond previous high points.

    But in this past quarter, a handful of neighborhoods and districts in the city have leapt well beyond the highest average home values achieved in the past. Interestingly, comparing these white-hot areas with one another, there are often huge differences in property type, era and style of construction, and neighborhood culture or ambiance. But all of them have been very affected by affluent – often newly affluent – high-tech professionals of one age group and level of affluence or another. Naturally, these neighborhoods are highly desired by other buyers too – often professionals in finance, bio-tech, medicine and law – but the high-tech-buyer dynamic has generally super-charged these markets in particular.

    However, please note that the difference we’re talking about between these neighborhoods and the rest of the city is between white hot and red hot: Quite honestly, they’re all very hot markets right now.

    The Inner Mission 

    Super hot, super hip, generally young: this neighborhood has seen very dramatic changes since the early nineties as a classic process of gentrification occurred — changes which have recently accelerated. Houses here are often large, classic Victorians, while the condos are mostly modern, built within the last decade or so. This area has a large, vibrant and diverse commercial district centered around Mission and Valencia Streets, but is still close to Noe Valley and the Castro. This chart focuses on the condo market, in which values are approximately 15% above the previous peak.

    Noe Valley – Eureka Valley (Castro) – Dolores Heights 

    These neighborhoods are part of a district that includes Cole Valley, Ashbury Heights, Clarendon & Corona Heights, Duboce Triangle, Mission Dolores and Glen Park, all of which have seen enormous recent appreciation. Housing here is typically older, built in the first 4 decades of the last century; there are many parks for kids and pets; the streets are tree-lined and the ambiance of the neighborhoods is relaxed and family friendly. This district surged in popularity and price in the mid-late nineties, was one of the last to peak in value in 2008, and has been at the forefront of the market rebound which started early here, in 2011. Among other advantages, it has relatively easy access to highways south to Silicon Valley. The district also has a large condo market, but this chart focuses on house values.

    South Beach & Yerba Buena 

    After the Embarcadero freeway came down in 1991 and then AT&T Park built in 2000, this area changed from a place for B-class offices and car stereo installations to the home of some of the most dramatic and expensive condo and loft buildings in the country. More condos are now sold here than anyplace else in the city and high-floor units with staggering views often sell for millions of dollars – one sold for $28 million. It’s popular with a number of demographics – high-tech and bio-tech workers working in offices nearby in SoMa and Mission Bay, financial district professionals, and empty-nesters who want to enjoy city life and have all the amenities, but without the responsibility of maintaining a house. Affluent foreign buyers are also a significant segment. Its neighborhood ambiance is very urban. This chart is for condos below the price of $1,800,000, but the dynamic for ultra-luxury condos is also white hot, with an average dollar per square foot value of over $1200.

    Bernal Heights 

    Like Noe Valley and Glen Park, Bernal Heights was originally a blue-collar neighborhood filled with Victorian houses. Noe Valley soared in value first, becoming wildly popular, and now people who want a similar family-friendly neighborhood ambiance, but at a more affordable cost, have increasingly turned to Bernal Heights. It also has easy access to highways south to the peninsula.

     

    Hayes Valley-North of Panhandle (NoPa)-Alamo Square

    This condo market is made up of two totally different types: Edwardian flats that have been turned into condos and brand new, ultra-modern condo developments. The Hayes Valley commercial district is very hot and hip, similar to, but still different from the Mission’s Valencia Street. Buyers who are priced out of the nearby Cole Valley-Haight Ashbury condo market often look here for a similar neighborhood ambiance at lower cost. Hayes Valley is also close to the Civic Center cultural cluster of museum, opera, symphony, ballet and other performing arts, which appeals to another buyer demographic as well.

    To put all of these charts into one simple suggestion: It’s a great time to sell your property in San Francisco, and our market desperately needs the inventory!

    If you have questions or would like information regarding a neighborhood not listed above, please contact us.

    From San Francisco’s Sunnydale Projects To The Waves Of Marin: Escaping Violence In Search Of Fun

    “Me and my friend, we just started to have hecka fun…”
    “The last wave that I caught…it was SO huge…it was like, like 10-15 feet!”

    Hats off to the San Francisco locals that made this happen. Good stuff to warm your soul, and remind ourselves of the great people that live in our area. Chasing waves is certainly better for our youth than being chased by gang violence.

    -Rally.org/Rippleeffect [Vimeo]

    San Francisco “Luxury” Real Estate Market Report

    It’s funny, for the sake of talking market dynamics and data, we often refer to anything over $1,000,000 as “Luxury Home Sales”…at least most of the nation does, and so we’re kinda forced to as well. Even though we’re sharing these charts with you, and we’re clearly calling this a Luxury Market update, we’re starting to wonder at which point the über competitive price range of $1-2M stops becoming “Luxury”. I mean, really! A million bucks is still A LOT of money, isn’t it? So then, is a 1000 square foot condo that sells for $1,000,000 (Austin Powers voice), and doesn’t come with parking, a view, linen service, or a pool…luxury? (Yes, said condos already exist here.) Something to ponder on this Monday morning. Either way, have a look:

    LuxHomes_Unit_Sales_by_QuarterV2

    LuxHome_House-Sales_1500-1999_by-DistrictV2

    LuxHome_House-Sales_2000-4999_by_DistrictV2

    LuxHome_House-Sales_5m_by_DistrictV2

    LuxHome_Condo-Sales_1500-Above_by_DistrictV2

    The Tiniest Living Spaces in San Francisco

    Do you like The Bold Italic? Excellent! So do we. You’ll be pleased to know we’ve given them Carte Blanche to share some of their content directly on theFrontSteps for you to enjoy. This is the first effort, and a damn good one to boot. [Modified from the original version to fit here, but we did the best we could. Hope you like.]

    hero

    Whether it’s a closet-esque studio or the short-straw bedroom in an apartment, San Franciscans have evolved to forgo sofas and square footage for some of the “coziest” living spaces in the country. I talked to the inhabitants of seven spaces registering toward the “speck of dust” end of the size spectrum to learn about the good and the bad of micro living.

    —–

    Bi-small_info-beau_071113-7Bi-bestf_photos-beau_071013
    Have you always lived in small spaces? 
    No, but this was a very deliberate choice to attempt minimalism, and I love it. SF is so expensive so I’m glad to be saving money on rent.

    What’s the most frustrating part of living with little space? 

    Frustrating? You’re always on the border of insanity! I find packing a suitcase is the thing that makes me go crazy. But I’ve learned to pack in the hall.

    What’s the best part?
    I have some very hoard-y tendencies in my family, so this room keeps me in check. And of course climbing up into my loft
    bed always kinda feels like a tree house adventure.

    How have you adapted to the space? 
    I worked with two Task Rabbit carpenters to plan out three zones in my 49 square feet: chilling, working, and sleeping. Unfortunately, I mostly do one
    of those!
    How do people react to your place when they first see it? 
    People enter the room at normal room-entering speed and then are surprised to find so little.

     

     

     

     

    —–

    Bi-small_info-jackie_071013-4Bi-bestf_photos-jackie_071013

    What’s the most frustrating part of living with little space?
    Keeping it organized. It’s easy to just throw things when I come and go. You have to get creative – good thing I had Tetris training as a kid.

    What’s the best part? 

    No roommates.

    How have you adapted to the space? 
    Shelves and bins and just not being too serious.
    What did you have to sacrifice when you moved in? 
    Not having to fold up my bed when I have company.

    Is storage an issue? 

    I make it work. Example: I keep my mannequins (photography props) in my bathroom.

    Do you think one day it will get to you? 
    Yup. And then I’ll move.

    Do people ever remark about the place when they first see it? 
    All the time. They think I’m a hoarder until they enter all they way, then they realize it is just really fucking small.

     

     

     

     

     

    —–

    Bi-small_info-jacobarianne_071013-2Bi-bestf_photos-jacobarianne_071013

    Have you always lived in small spaces?Jacob – I lived in one other really small place in Venice Beach with my then-girlfriend and it killed our relationship after about a month. This space is just right, though. We make it work quite well.Ari – My smallest apartments have always been my favorite. You can live in every corner and make it your own. I hate wasted space.
    Do you like it? 
    We love it! Even if we could afford a giant SF apartment, we would keep this little place.
    What’s the most frustrating part of living with little space?
    Bulging closets – we both have a lot of clothing. And not having room for dinner parties or out-of-town guests. On the other hand, the small apartment gets us out around town more. We spend a lot of time stretching our legs in Golden Gate Park.

    Do you ever fantasize about having a larger space?
    We’re scheming to take over our neighbor’s apartment for a huge closet and a library.
    Is storage an issue? 
    Always. Our closets are compressed bricks of fabric. Ari’s shoes rove around the studio in a big bag.

     

     

     

     

     

    —–

    Bi-small_info-helenjoshzoe_071113-4Bi-bestf_photos-helenjoshzoe_071013

    Have you lived in small spaces before? 

    Josh and I lived in a small (but very space-efficient) studio in Japan in a small town south of Kyoto for about a year. We lived on a sailboat for a month (never slept on land, though of course went on land
    to shop).

    How did the decision to turn the closet into a nursery come about? 

    We turned a closet into a nursery out of necessity. We would have loved to move into a two-bedroom apartment before Zoe was born but because rents are so high right now, it didn’t make financial sense. So we decided to make it work.
    I was still skeptical that we could do it but Josh kept reminding me that if we lived in Japan, we’d probably do with even less space.

    What’s the best and most difficult part of the situation?

    I think the most difficult part was finding the time and energy to sort through all our stuff to make room. It’s amazing what you can accumulate in 10 years. The best part is that it’s made us really think about what we want to buy. There are so many things you can get for babies but we need to buy smart and only things we absolutely need.

    Anything else noteworthy? 

    This isn’t tiny-space related, but when Josh and I were writing a book on San Francisco, we found out that Robert Crumb used to hang out here a lot. It turns out his brother lived in our apartment for years and Robert Crumb would give our landlord some of his drawings. Josh wrote him to ask about his time in SF and in our place, and Robert Crumb sent us a handwritten letter back that we
    still have on the wall.

    —–

    Bi-small_info-sophie_071013-2Bi-bestf_photos-sophie_071013

    What’s the most frustrating part of living with little space? 

    What has been most frustrating is that I currently don’t have room for a desk. I am used to having a space where I can spread out, do projects, read, etc. Right now that space is my bed, which you might imagine, is not the favorable place to get work done. As for keeping it clean, by nature, I am a pretty organized person, but in the past I would have my “off” days – because the space would allow for it. But now that my room is so small, I can’t spare the space for any messes. Literally, there is place for everything, and everything is in its place, otherwise I’d go nuts. It’s actually almost easier to clean because there isn’t enough room for a broom; I just wipe a rag on where the floor is exposed and voilà.

    What’s the best part?

    I don’t ever lose anything. I can
    see every corner of my room so there is nowhere I could possibly misplace anything.

    Do you ever fantasize about having a larger space?

    All the time, but mostly because I’ll get bored with the layout of the room and want to change it up.Unfortunately, with the size, there is only really one way the furniture can be arranged.

    Do people ever remark about the place when they first see it?

    I think every person that has stepped foot in here has made some comment about how tiny the space is, even after several warnings. I once dated a guy who refused to stay here because the room was too small. To his credit, he was a giant, so I guess I get it.

     

    —–

    Bi-small_info-wesamanda_071013-2Bi-bestf_photos-wesamanda_071013

    What’s the most frustrating part of living with little space?

    Balancing work and living space is probably the most difficult aspect of our apartment. Amanda runs her makeup business from home and I’m often up late working on freelance projects. Having your desk across from your bed can be the nemesis of productivity.

    Do you ever fantasize about having a larger space? 

    Honestly, not really. We find a lot of satisfaction in working within our constraints and slowly upgrading furniture, foliage, and other pieces as our tight budget allows.

    Do you think one day it will get to you?

    I guess most of our complaints are pretty typical of a 90-year-old apartment building: a smoke detector that’s located just feet from the kitchen stove (and can’t tell the difference between dinner and a four-alarm fire), closets that are just a tiny bit narrower than the average clothes hanger, and enough electrical outlets to invest in an impressive number of extension cords. On most days the square footage we have to work with is the least of our worries.

     

     

    —–

    Bi-small_info-alyona_071013-2Bi-bestf_photos-alyona_071013

    What’s the best part of living with such little space? 

    It’s just so cozy. That’s the best part. People naturally like things that are small and cute, and that perfectly describes my apartment. All my furniture is small too, so it’s like living in this miniature world that’s all mine.

    What’s the most frustrating?

    Counter space is definitely a problem. I am already missing the cooking gene, and learning to cook while trying to balance the cutting board on the teeny tiny space between the sink and dish rack – not ideal.

    How have you adapted to the space? 

    My closet is so small that I switch the clothes out seasonally and store the rest at my parents’ house. Also, I use the microwave as a
    plant stand.

    Do you ever fantasize about having a larger space? 

    I fantasize about it a lot. Closets, couches, and counter space.

    What did you have to sacrifice when you moved in?

    Being able to host out-of-town guests, and also having a couch that’s not also my bed.

    Is storage an issue?

    Definitely. Like Carrie in Sex and the City, there have been times when I’ve stored sweaters in my oven. Good thing I can’t bake if my life depends on it!

    Do you think one day it will get to you? 

    There are only so many times in your life you want to push the clothes in the closet with all your might just to be able to extract that one dress you wanted to wear. I think fairly soon, I will be ready for a bigger place, where I can host out-of-town guests, store all my shoes and clothes at once, and not have to pick between a toaster and a juicer.

     

    —–

    Bi-small_info-lindsay_071013-2Bi-bestf_photos-lindsay_071013

    Have you ever lived in a smaller space than this one?

    The smallest space I’ve ever lived
    in was where I lived before this studio; it was the tiniest studio I had ever seen. It was in a building at the top of Nob Hill, which afforded the best views of the Golden Gate Bridge,but I literally had a foot wide path to walk through in my living area because everything was so jammed into the space.

    Do you like it?

    I love my studio now- compared to my last place this is a mansion!

    What’s the most  frustrating part of living with little space?

    STORAGE. I have a walk in closet, but it is stuffed to the gills with all of my stuff. I walk in there to get something and walk right back out because sometimes I just can’t deal with having to find stuff in there. Also, entertaining is next to impossible. I hosted a birthday brunch for myself a few months back, and twenty-something people were scattered all over the floor; my cat was getting into everyone’s plates and I’m sure at least 5 glasses of champagne were spilled. It was a mess.

    Do you ever fantasize about having a larger space?

    My boyfriend and I are moving to NYC in August and we will be finding a place together. NYC is the wrong city to move to if you’re looking for larger spaces! But, as cheesy as it sounds, it’s not really the size that matters but the energy you create within a space that makes it “home.” Mostly, I just want to have a garden someday! The closest I have to a garden now is some dying plants on a fire escape.

    Anything else interesting or noteworthy?

    Well as I’m writing this, the only thing I can think of is how loud it is outside my window. Living on Geary is a mistake! It is the LOUDEST street in SF!

     

    —–

    Bi-small_info-jennifer_071013-2Bi-bestf_photos-jennifer_071013

    Have you always lived in small spaces?

    Only in San Francisco…

    What’s the most frustrating part of living  with little space?

    Clutter builds quickly and easily. I’m always trying to find creative ways to create storage.

    What’s the best part? 

    It’s easier to clean, and makes me restrict any impulse shopping.

    How have you accommodated/adjusted  to the space?

    My place didn’t come with a closet, so I had a custom loft-bed built so I could use the space underneath as storage. I also modified a butcher-block table by chopping off the legs and putting wheels on them, so I could use it as my combination desk/dining/coffee table just by rolling it around the space as I
    need it.

    What did you have to sacrifice when you moved in?

    I had a pretty big book collection since college, along with a pretty big video collection (both VHS & DVD). I didn’t have enough room for both collections, so I donated all my books to the SF Library…but kept all my videos.

    —–

    (Written by Jessica Saia. Photography by Abby Wilcox. Design by Ryan Raphael. Originally published on The Bold Italic.)

    Overheated Real Estate Market? Yes. Bubble? We’re Saying No…

    Many adjectives are used to describe San Francisco, but normal isn’t a common one – and the same can be said about our real estate market. Even taking into account its tendency to be different in one way or another, this past spring’s market was overheated by virtually any definition. Surging consumer confidence and huge buyer demand chased a deeply inadequate supply of homes for sale, abetted by interest rates so low that loans – factoring in inflation and mortgage interest deduction – were almost like free money. All this led to an extreme seller’s market, a feeding frenzy and dramatic price appreciation.

    But not, in our opinion, a bubble. The Economist, one of the first to sound the alarm for the last bubble, sees no sign of a U.S. housing bubble, basing its conclusion upon historical comparisons of home prices with rents and incomes. Also, it is not unusual for the market to go somewhat crazy following a 4-5 year down cycle after all the repressed demand bursts forth – this happened in 1996-1997 too. Besides which, we are only about 18 months into the current recovery. Though real estate is susceptible to sudden economic and political shocks, in past cycles, recoveries have typically lasted at least 6-8 years before peaking. That doesn’t mean there won’t be any short-term market adjustments, up or down, for one reason or another, along the way.

    There are some signs of a normalizing market. After a year of declines, the number of new listings in the 2nd quarter was a little higher than the 2nd quarter of 2012. Though this inventory was quickly gobbled up and overall supply remains very low, it’s a good sign more sellers are entering the market. Median prices may be leveling off after spring’s big pop – it’s still too soon to be sure, but summer often sees a cooling down. It’s not welcome news to buyers, but interest rates have increased from extreme lows – though remaining very low by any historical scale. (See below: The Sky is Not Falling.) The distressed home segment, which distorts markets, is disappearing in the city and declining everywhere. And new-home construction continues to increase: even though we won’t see much of this new inventory until 2014 and later, it’s a very positive sign.

    San Francisco Median Home Prices

    For both houses and condos, the second quarter saw jumps well above previous peak values. Median sales prices are affected by other factors besides changes in value – seasonality, inventory, buyer profile, big changes in the distressed and luxury home segments – but the dramatic increases do reflect rapidly climbing home values in the city. Though all SF neighborhoods have been experiencing striking appreciation, this does not mean that all of them have now exceeded previous peak values.

    Sales Over & Under List Price

    This chart illustrates the enormous percentage of listings that sold for over – and sometimes far over – asking price. One in four houses sold for 20% or more above asking, which in San Francisco often equals hundreds of thousands of dollars.

    San Francisco Luxury Home Sales

    No market segment has been affected more dramatically by the recovery than luxury homes. In an inventory constrained environment, it has far out-performed the general market in unit sales – general unit sales were actually down, second quarter, year over year. Our new report also delineates the neighborhoods which dominate high-end house and condo sales: SF Luxury Home Report

    Interest Rates: The Sky is Not Falling

    Not to diminish legitimate concerns regarding rising mortgage rates and their effects on housing costs, but this graph puts recent increases in context. At any time 2011 and before, the current interest rates, even after their recent big percentage jump, would be reason for conga lines of celebration in the streets. Rates had to rise from their historic and artificial lows – how far and fast this may continue is unknown to us, but we don’t presently expect big shocks to the real estate market in the immediate future.

    Very Few Price Reductions

    89% of second quarter sales sold quickly without price reductions, at an average of 8% over list price – a clear indication of overheating. Still, not every listing sold without a price reduction and some didn’t sell at all, but ended up withdrawn from the market – in the last quarter, over 300 listings. (Many of these will eventually be re-listed, often at lower prices, and then sold.)

    What Sells Where

    What district of San Francisco has more house sales than any other? Which area has far more condo sales? You may be surprised at the answers.

    Distressed Home Sales

    The distressed home market in San Francisco is dwindling into insignificance. In most neighborhoods, the effect of these sales has disappeared altogether.

    New Listings Coming on Market

    The second quarter saw an increase in new listings not only against the first quarter of the year, which is normal, but against the second quarter of 2012. This is a hopeful sign if it continues.

    Months Supply of Inventory (MSI)

    Even with the increase in new listings in the second quarter, inventory remains drastically low by this measurement of demand versus supply.

    Listings for Sale

    Average Days on Market (DOM)

    Time on market before acceptance of offer has also hit historic lows for virtually every property type in the city.

    Percentage of Listings Accepting Offers

    This is another clear statistic measuring demand against supply, and it is at historic highs.

    All data from sources deemed reliable, but may contain errors and is subject to revision. Statistics are generalities and how they apply to any specific property is unknown. All numbers should be considered approximate.

     

    What Costs How Much Where In San Francisco

    A Survey of Recent San Francisco Home Sales

    March-May 2013

    Below are samples of recent city home sales sorted by price point. The list is not comprehensive and the sales are not necessarily representative of typical neighborhood values. In real estate, the devil is always in the details, and the short descriptions below cannot convey the many objective and subjective criteria that make up value. Still, they give an idea of what one can (or, at least could in recent months) purchase in San Francisco. 



As seen below, a large percentage of properties has been selling well over asking price: for example, in April, 90% of closed SF home listings sold, without going through any price reductions, at an average sales price 7.5% above list price. A red-hot market.

    Abbreviations: BR=bedroom, BA=bath, DOM=days on market, LP=list price, sq.ft.=square foot/feet, HOA=homeowner’s association, pkg=parking space(s). Room counts do not include bathrooms, garages, storage rooms or rooms built without permit (bonus rooms): a 2 BR/2 BA home with a formal dining room, a living room and a kitchen would be considered 5 rooms. With a combined living-dining room: 4 rooms. A family room or office would count as an additional room.

    Besides the sales below, maps and neighborhood values reports can be found here.
    To get recent sales & new listings delivered to your inbox weekly, subscribe to sfnewsletter (no spam, no junk, just the Goods.)

     Over $12,000,000

    $12,750,000. Pacific Heights on Jackson: the 4-level, 18-room, 7 bedroom/7.5 bath Hellman Mansion, originally designed and built by Julius Krafft in 1902; 11,500 square feet, 7 fireplaces, bay views, 2 car parking. 100 days on market (DOM), sold at 86% of original list price (LP) for $1109/square foot.

    $12,375,000. Russian Hill on Francisco: 12-room, 7 BR/5.5 BA, 6050 sq.ft. mansion built in 1888; sweeping bay and city views, 4 view terraces, 2 car pkg. 70 days on market (DOM), sold at 92% of list price (LP) for $2045/sq.ft.

     

    $5,000,000 – $10,000,000

    $9,500,000. Presidio Heights on Presidio Terrace cul de sac: 14-room, 5 BR/6.5 BA, 1911 Beaux Arts mansion formerly the home of Mayor Alioto; 8040 sq.ft., library, home theatre. 29 days on market (DOM), 106% of list price, $1182/sq.ft.

    $7,000,000. Presidio Heights on Pacific: 1951, detached, 11-room, 5 BR/4 BA, contemporary home featured on 2012 AIA Tour; 4264 sq.ft.; park, bay and GG Bridge views; roof deck; wine cellar for 800 bottles; 2 pkg. 13 DOM, 108% of LP, $1642/sq.ft.

    $6,500,000. Russian Hill on Green: 3-level, 5 BR/6.5 BA, penthouse condo built in 1986; 5600 sq.ft., panoramic bay views, private elevator, 3 pkg, $1500/month HOA dues. 44 DOM, 108% of list price (LP), $1161/sq.ft.

    $5,500,000. Clarendon Heights on St. Germain: 3-story, 5 BR/7 BA, modern home; views from GG Bridge to Mt. Diablo, 5701 sq.ft., elevator, deck, 2 pkg. 45 DOM, 102% of LP, $965/sq.ft.

    $5,500,000. Buena Vista Park: 5-story, 21-room, 6 BR/5 BA, Arts & Crafts mansion with no parking; 6000 sq.ft., au pair quarters, deck; views of bay, city and GG bridge. 56 DOM, 100% of LP, $917/sq.ft.

     

    About $3,000,000

    $3,000,000. Noe Valley on 26th Street: 9-room, 4 BR/3.5 BA, custom house; 3058 sq.ft., city and bay views, 2 pkg. 6 DOM, 108% of LP, $981/sq.ft.

    $3,000,000. Pacific Heights on Pacific: 2-level, 3 BR/3.5 BA, Edwardian condo; bay view, exclusive deck, music room, library, 1 pkg, $387/month HOA dues. 18 DOM, 100% of LP.

    $2,995,000. Marina on Avila: 12-room, 4 BR/4 BA house built in 1925; 3025 sq.ft. + 600 sq.ft. deck, seismic upgrades, 2 pkg. 14 DOM, 109% of LP, $975/sq.ft.

    $2,875,000. St. Francis Wood on Santa Clara: 1917, 4 BR/4.5 BA, detached, Spanish-Med house on double parcel; 3948 sq.ft., ocean views, 2 pkg, $4300/year HOA dues. 15 DOM, 120% of LP, $728/sq.ft.

     

    About $2,500,000

    $2,550,000. South Beach on 1st: 2008, 5-room, 2 BR/2 BA, high-rise condo at One Rincon; “sky-level” bridge to bridge views, 1568 sq.ft., patio, 1 pkg, $854/month HOA dues. 20 DOM, 96% of LP, $1626/sq.ft.

    $2,550,000. Alamo Square on Hayes: 1891, 4-level, 11-room, 5 BR/4.5 BA Victorian with in-law apartment; 3804 sq.ft., downtown views, no parking. 0 DOM, 98% of LP, $670/sq.ft.

    $2,500,000. Noe Valley on Elizabeth: 1906, 7-room, 3BR/3 BA, “contemporary” house with studio-cottage; 2178 sq.ft., deck, hot tub, 2 pkg. 0 DOM, 125% of LP, $1148/sq.ft. $2,495,000. Sea Cliff on Lake: 1921, detached, 11-room, 5 BR/3 BA, traditional home; 2860 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 22 DOM, 100% of LP, $872/sq.ft.

    $2,495,000. Sea Cliff on Lake: 1921, detached, 11-room, 5 BR/3 BA, traditional home; 2860 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 22 DOM, 100% of LP, $872/sq.ft.

    $2,450,000. St. Francis Wood on San Buenaventura Way: 1941, 11-room, detached, 5 BR/3 BA, traditional home; 2 pkg, $2376/year HOA dues. 26 DOM, 111% of LP.

     

    About $2,000,000

    $2,060,000. Cole Valley on Stanyan: 1910, 9-room, 4 BR/2 BA house — legally a 2-unit bldg; 2183 sq.ft. + bonus rooms and bath, deck, 2 pkg. 21 DOM, 122% of LP, $944/sq.ft.

    $2,050,000. Dolores Park on Church: 2-level, 8-room, Art Deco, 3 BR/3 BA, penthouse TIC in 6 unit bldg; 2749 sq.ft., 3 pkg, downtown and bay views, private patio and garden, $575/month HOA dues. 34 DOM, 103% of LP, $746/sq.ft.

    $2,025,000. Inner Richmond on 10th: 8-room, 4 BR/2.5 BA, 1911, detached Edwardian; 2770 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 53 DOM, 107% of LP, $731/sq.ft.

    $2,007,000. Glen Park on Laidley: 3-level, 4 BR/3 BA, modern house built in 1997; 2600 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 6 DOM, 115% of LP, $772/sq.ft.

    $2,000,000. Lake Street on Lake: 9-room, 4 BR/2.5 BA, 1914 Edwardian; 2784 sq.ft., 2 pkg, large deck. 19 DOM, 114% of LP, $718/sq.ft.

    $1,995,000. Telegraph Hill on Francisco: 3-level, 3 BR/2.5 BA, Mediterranean-style, townhouse condo built in 1988; 2374 sq.ft., 3 terraces, bay and city views, $1971/month HOA dues, 2 pkg. 100% of LP, $840/sq.ft.

    $1,950,000. Bernal Heights on Nevada: 7-room, 4 BR/3.5 BA, contemporary home; 2879 sq.ft., bay views, full floor master suite, solar heat, 2 pkg. 31 DOM, 93% of LP, $677/sq.ft.

     

    About $1,750,000

    $1,775,000. Financial District on Pacific: 1984, 2-level, 3 BR/3 BA condo at Golden Gateway Commons; 1850 sq.ft., 4 decks, downtown and Bay Bridge views, 1 pkg, $747/month HOA dues. 2 DOM, 100% of LP, $959/sq.ft.

    $1,750,000. Lower Pacific Heights on Pine: 8-room, 2-level, 4 BR/3.5 BA, Victorian condo in 2 unit bldg; 2375 sq.ft., 1 pkg, $300/month HOA dues. 26 DOM, 100% of LP, $737/sq.ft.

    $1,750,000. Pacific Heights on Green: 1988, 5-room, 2-level, 2 BR/2 BA, townhouse condo; 1560 sq.ft., large view deck, GG bridge and bay views, 1 pkg, $577/month HOA dues. 27 DOM, 97.5% of LP, $1122/sq.ft.

    $1,740,000. Mt. Davidson Manor on Monterey: 1930, 7-room, detached, 4 BR/3 BA, Spanish-Med house; 2668 sq.ft., ocean views, 1 pkg. 20 DOM, 116% of LP, $652/sq.ft.

    $1,700,000. Eureka Valley on Caselli: 1918, 3 BR/2 BA Edwardian; 1720 sq.ft., deck, south garden, 1 car pkg pad, plans for 1st floor expansion. 7 DOM, 122% of LP, $988/sq.ft.

     

    About $1,500,000

    $1,550,000. Cole Valley on Belvedere: 1907, upper unit, 2-level, 4BR/3 BA condo in 3-unit bldg; 2535 sq.ft., city and park views, 1 pkg, $300/month HOA dues. 30 DOM, 107% of LP, $611/sq.ft.

    $1,515,000. South Beach on Brannan: 5-room, 2 BR/2 BA condo at The Brannan; 1602 sq.ft., city lights views, 1 pkg, 24-hour security, $977/month HOA dues. 14 DOM, 101% of LP, $946/sq.ft.

    $1,505,000. Marina on Francisco: 3 BR/1.5 BA, full-floor condo built in 1923; 2 unit bldg, 1400 sq.ft., 1 pkg, $200/month HOA dues. 14 DOM, 116% of LP, $1075/sq.ft.

    $1,500,000. Eureka Valley on Collingwood: 7-room, 2 BR/2 BA, contemporary house with no parking; 1850 sq.ft., downtown and bay views, deck, spa. 109% of LP, $810/sq.ft.

    $1,500,000. Sherwood Forest on Casitas: 1952, 5 BR/4 BA, detached modern home; 4769 sq.ft. + basement, city and ocean views. 255 days on market, 75% of LP, $315/sq.ft.

    $1,475,000. Inner Sunset on 5th: 1908, 4 BR/1.5 BA, Arts & Crafts Edwardian; 1864 sq.ft. + huge attic, deck, 1 pkg. 106% of LP, $791/sq.ft.

     

    About $1,250,000

    $1,275,000. Mission Dolores on Dorland: 6-room, top floor, 3 BR/1.25 BA, Edwardian condo with leased off-site parking; 1490 sq.ft., Liberty Hill views, shared yard, $660/month for HOA and pkg. 7 DOM, 116% of LP, $856/sq.ft.

    $1,268,500. Inner Mission on Lexington: 2002, 6-room, top floor, 2-level, 3 BR/2.5 BA condo. 1589 sq.ft., Twin Peaks views, deck, 1 pkg, $319/month HOA dues. 15 DOM, 123% of LP, $798/sq.ft.

    $1,265,000. Potrero Hill on Carolina. 1957, 7-room, 4 BR/2 BA, midcentury home; 1608 sq.ft., 1 pkg. 21 DOM, 101% of LP, $787/sq.ft.

    $1,265,000. Haight Ashbury on Page: 1908, 6-room, top floor, 3 BR/1.75 BA condo in 2 unit bldg; private south deck, 1783 sq.ft., $150/month HOA. 18 DOM, 120% of LP, $709/sq.ft.

    $1,260,000. Lone Mountain on Stanyan: 1937, 3 BR/1 BA, traditional house near Rossi Park; 1923 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 14 DOM, 110% of LP, $655/sq.ft.

    $1,260,000. South Beach on 1st: 4-room, 2 BR/2 BA condo at The Metropolitan high-rise; panoramic views in 3 directions, 1166 sq.ft., large patio, 24-hour doorman, 1 pkg. 36 DOM, 101% of LP, $1081/sq.ft.

    $1,251,000. Golden Gate Heights on 15th: 1946, 4 BR/3 BA, traditional house; 1781 sq.ft., bonus family room, ocean views, 2-tier patio, 2 pkg. 14 DOM, 126% of LP, $702/sq.ft.

    $1,250,000. Central Richmond on 29th: 1936, 8-room, 4 BR/4 BA, center-patio, Spanish-Med home; 1705 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 21 DOM, 114% of LP, $733/sq.ft.

    $1,235,000. SoMa on Stevenson: 2008-built, multi-level, 3 BR/3 BA, townhouse condo; 1679 sq.ft., 2 decks, 1 pkg, $402/month HOA dues. 25 DOM, 118% of LP, $736/sq.ft.

     

    About $1,000,000

    $950,000. Hayes Valley on Fillmore: 1981, 2 BR/2 BA condo flat in 3 unit bldg; 1500 sq.ft., 1 pkg, deck, $270/month HOA dues. 8 DOM, 119% of LP, $633/sq.ft.

    $985,000. Duboce Triangle on 14th: 1907, 3 BR/2 BA, Victorian TIC flat in 3 unit bldg; 1529 sq.ft., 1 pkg, city lights view. 22 DOM, 109.5% of LP, $644/sq.ft.

    $995,000. Lake Street on 2nd: 1946, 5-room, top floor, 2 BR/1 BA condo in 2 unit bldg; 1209 sq.ft., 1 pkg, $200/month HOA dues. 11 DOM, 117% of LP, $823/sq.ft.

    $999,000. Yerba Buena on Folsom: 2009, 5-room, 2 BR/2 BA condo at Blu; 1230 sq.ft., den, 1 pkg, $715/month HOA dues. 23 DOM, 105% of LP, $812/sq.ft.

    $1,000,000. Outer Richmond on Fulton: 1931, 7-room, 3 BR/2 BA, Marina-style house; 1950 sq.ft., 1 pkg. 30 DOM, 118% of LP, $513/sq.ft.

    $1,000,000. Central Sunset on 32nd: 1939, 6-room, 3 BR/1.5 BA, center-patio house; 1815 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 21 DOM, 105% of LP, $551/sq.ft.

    $1,000,000. Bernal Heights on Bonview cul de sac: 1958, 3-level, 2 BR/2 BA, contemporary house; 1700 sq.ft., deck, western views, 1 pkg. Sold off-market, $588/sq.ft.

    $1,001,000. Nob Hill on Washington: 2006, 4-room, 2 BR/2 BA, contemporary flat; 978 sq.ft., 1 pkg, $485/month HOA dues. 8 DOM, 111% of LP, $1023/sq.ft.

    $1,005,000. North of Panhandle (NoPa) on Hayes: 1989, 4-room, 2-level, 2 BR/2 BA, townhouse condo; 1620 sq.ft., 2 pkg, private deck, $605/month HOA dues. 41 DOM, 106% of LP, $620/sq.ft.

    $1,015,000. Glen Park on Van Buren: 1913, detached, 2 BR/2 BA Edwardian with no parking; 1249 sq.ft., city and bay views, “gardener’s paradise”. 52 DOM, 107% of LP, $813/sq.ft.

     

    About $800,000

    $795,000. Crocker Amazon on Lowell: 1923, 6-room, 2 BR/1 BA house; 1820 sq.ft., sunroom, bonus rooms, probate sale, 2 pkg. 18 offers, 119% of LP, $437/sq.ft.

    $799,000. Lower Pacific Heights on Baker: top floor, 2 BR/1 BA, Victorian condo in 2 unit bldg; 902 sq.ft. + undeveloped attic, 1 pkg, $200/month HOA dues. 40 DOM, 100% of LP, $886/sq.ft.

    $800,000. Outer Sunset on 44th: 1931, 2 BR/1 BA, Spanish-Med house; 1200 sq.ft., 1 pkg, 2 bonus rooms and bath. 20 DOM, 125% of LP, $667/sq.ft. (not including bonus rooms).

    $800,000. Miraloma Park on Portola: 1926, 6-room, 3 BR/1 BA, detached Tudor home; 1435 sq.ft., bonus attic room, 3 pkg. 6 DOM, 123% of LP, $557/sq.ft.

    $800,000. Inner Mission on 21st: 1999, 1 BR/1.5 BA live-work loft condo; 1137 sq.ft., 1 pkg, $260/month HOA dues. 17 DOM, 114% of LP, $704/sq.ft.

    $805,000. Outer Parkside on 46th: 1943, 7-room, 3 BR/2 BA house; 1432 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 7 DOM, 121% of LP, $562/sq.ft.

    $806,000. Mission Terrace on Santa Rosa: 1925, 6-room, 2 BR/1 BA house; 1600 sq.ft., trust sale, bonus room, 2 pkg. 124% of LP, $504/sq.ft.

    $810,000. Noe Valley on Fair Oaks: 1900, 5-room, lower level, 2 BR/1 BA flat in 2 unit condo bldg with leased parking offsite; 1184 sq.ft., $250/month HOA dues. 104% of LP, $684/sq.ft.

    $810,000. Midtown Terrace on Dellbrook: 1956, 2 BR/1 BA, mid-century home; 937 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 20 DOM, 108% of LP, $864/sq.ft.

     

    About $650,000

    $635,000. Excelsior on Maynard: 1907, 3 BR/1 BA, Victorian cottage with no parking; 1100 sq.ft. + bonus room, seismic retrofit. 33 DOM, 116% of LP, $577/sq.ft.

    $638,000. Silver Terrace on Silver: 1941, 5-room, 2 BR/1.5 BA house; 1075 sq.ft. + large bonus family room, 2 pkg. 31 DOM, 107% of LP, $593/sq.ft.

    $649,000. Dogpatch on 23rd: 1 BR/1 BA live-work loft built in 2000; 1084 sq.ft., private patio, $502/month HOA dues, 1 pkg. 28 DOM, 100% of LP, $599/sq.ft.

    $649,000. Pacific Heights on Washington: 2001, 1 BR/1 BA condo in high-rise Pacific Place; 745 sq.ft., Nob Hill views, 1 pkg, 24-hour security, tenant-occupied, $609/month HOA dues. 22 DOM, 100% of LP, $871/sq.ft.

    $650,000. Central Richmond on 15th: lower level, Marina-style, 6-room, 2 BR/1 BA TIC flat in 2 unit bldg; 1350 sq.ft., 1 pkg, tenant occupied. 26 DOM, 108.5% of LP, $481/sq.ft.

    $652,000. North of Panhandle (NoPa) on Broderick: 2007, 4-room, top floor, 1 BR/1 BA condo in mid-rise bldg; 671 sq.ft., 1 pkg, city lights view, $404/month HOA dues. 18 DOM, 109% of LP, $972/sq.ft.

    $653,000. Parkside on Vicente: 1939, 4-room, 2 BR/1 BA, contemporary home; 837 sq.ft., 1 pkg. 29 DOM, 109% of LP, $780/sq.ft.

    $655,000. Potrero Hill on Kansas: 2007, 4-room, 1 BR/1 BA condo at The Potrero; 804 sq.ft., downtown views, 1 pkg, $470/month HOA dues. 28 DOM, 109% of LP, $815/sq.ft.

    $665,000. South Beach on King: 2007, 3-room, 1 BR/1 BA condo in high-rise; 681 sq.ft., city views, 1 pkg, $561/month HOA dues. 28 DOM, 102% of LP, $977/sq.ft.

    $657,000. Sunnyside on Judson: 5-room, 2 BR/2 BA, split-level contemporary; 1226 sq.ft., 1 pkg. 31 DOM, 116% of LP, $536/sq.ft.

     

    About $500,000

    $485,000. Western Addition on Eddy: 1992, 2 BR/2 BA condo in low-rise bldg.; 812 sq.ft., 1 pkg, $411/month HOA dues. 124% of LP, $610/sq.ft.

    $500,000. Oceanview on Minerva: 1941, 5-room, 2 BR/1 BA, contemporary house; 1030 sq.ft., sunroom, 1 pkg. 22 DOM, 116% of LP, $485/sq.ft.

    $500,000. Portola on Woolsey: 1948, 5-room, 2 BR/1 BA, tunnel-entrance “fixer” house; 1250 sq.ft., 2 pkg. 17 DOM, 91% of LP, $400/sq.ft.

    $500,000. Twin Peaks on Gardenside: 1975, top floor, 3-room, 1 BR/1 BA condo; 180 degree downtown and bay views, 693 sq.ft., 1 pkg, $342/month HOA dues. 117% of LP, $722/sq.ft.

    $500,000. Civic Center on Van Ness: top floor, 1 BR/1 BA condo at Opera Plaza; 682 sq.ft., 1 pkg, 24-hour security, deck, $862/month for HOA dues and parking. 13 DOM, 114% of LP, $733/sq.ft.

    $510,000. Bayview on Shafter: 1951, 8-room, 2 BR/1 BA home with legal 2 BR unit; 1695 sq.ft., 1 pkg. 24 DOM, 106% of LP, $301/sq.ft.

     

    $300,000 – $400,000

    $340,000. Visitacion Valley on Wilde: 1922, 1 BR/1 BA house; 700 sq.ft., 3 pkg. 20 DOM, 110% of LP, $486/sq.ft.

    $368,000. Bayview on Rebecca Lane: 1992, 2 BR/2 BA house; bay views, deck, 1237 sq.ft., 1 pkg. 29 DOM, 108% of LP, $297/sq.ft.

    $378,900. Downtown on Frank Norris Place: 1 BR/1 BA condo without parking; 522 sq.ft., south and east views, must be 55+ years old, $367/month HOA dues. 25 DOM, 100% of LP, $726/sq.ft.

    $380,000. Downtown on O’Farrell: top floor, studio condo at The Hamilton; 480 sq.ft., huge south and east views, tenant occupied, $574/month HOA dues + $250/month for parking. 34 DOM, 100% of LP, $792/sq.ft.

    $385,000. Diamond Heights on Red Rock Way: 1972, studio condo with 1 car pkg; 592 sq.ft., $407/month HOA dues. 129% of LP, $650/sq.ft.

     

    Dollar per Square Foot ($/sq.ft.) is based upon the home’s interior living space and should not include garages, unfinished attics and basements, rooms built without permit, outdoor space, patios and decks-though all these can still add value. These figures are usually derived from appraisals or tax records, but are sometimes measured in different ways, unreliable or unreported altogether. All things being equal, a house will sell for a higher dollar per square foot than a condo (due to land value), a condo higher than a TIC (quality of title), and a TIC higher than a multi-unit building (quality of use). All things being equal, a smaller home will sell for a lower sales price, but a higher dollar per square foot than a larger one. However, with our enormous variety in property types, all things are rarely equal in San Francisco real estate. There are often huge variations of value within a single neighborhood: the specific location, property condition, architectural style and curb appeal, amenities, parking, views, lot size & outdoor space all affect dollar per square foot values. Typically, the highest figures in San Francisco are achieved by penthouse condos with utterly spectacular views in prestige, doorman buildings, and by mansions in the absolute best locations of the most prestigious neighborhoods-more often than not, they too will have great views.

     

    How these sales apply to the value of any particular property is unknown without a specific comparative market analysis.

     

    Buying A Home In San Francisco: 5 Step (Awesome) Infographic

    Remember that post I did about the “5 Steps to Buying a Home In San Francisco“? Well, check out this awesome infographic, using that awesome information, I shared with you awesome people:

    5 Steps to Buying A Home In San Francisco
    [Click Image to Enlarge]

    Thank you Paragon Real Estate for putting this together.

    -Step 1 to buying a home in San Francisco [theFrontSteps.com]
    -Step 2 to buying a home in San Francisco [theFrontSteps.com]
    -Step 3 to buying a home in San Francisco [theFrontSteps.com]
    -Step 4 to buying a home in San Francisco [theFrontSteps.com]
    -Step 5 to buying a home in San Francisco [theFrontSteps.com]

    “I Bet It Sold For…” There’s An App (In San Francisco) For That

    Just Sold (the app) wants you to put your money where your mouth is (assuming you’re betting people like ourselves), and guess the sales price of homes in San Francisco and our oh-so hyperlocal neighborhoods, and they’ve made a game of it (because isn’t that what all this crazy overbidding is anyway? A Game.)

    justsoldtheo

    The concept is simple, pull up your desired ‘hood, find a property, guess what it sold for. Get it right, or get it wrong, and move on to the next. It’s another great way for you to get to know your neighborhood sales as they happen, and another great way for you to claim ultimate real estate knowledge from the comfort of that big fat armchair you’re sitting in. Call out your neighbors, call out your friends. You know you’re the expert, and don’t let any Realtor tell you otherwise.

    theosold

    After you download this app, you might ask yourself, “Why can’t I see ALL of the recent sales in San Francisco?” Well now, that’s a long murky story, but ultimately, the MLS holds that data, and they don’t want you to have access to it, unless it’s coming from your real estate agent, and you’ve established a “relationship” with said agent. We’ll leave it at that.

    Currently two brokerages allow their listings to display on the app (Zephyr Real Estate, and Hill & Co.), so until MLS either loosens its grip, or other brokerages opt in to sharing on this service too, that’s all you’re gonna get.

    Anyhow, check out the app. It’s kinda fun…

    -Just Sold in iTunes Store [Apple]
    -Just Listed, Just Sold San Francisco [sfnewsletter/MarketTracker]
    -Some insight on how to bid in this market [theFrontSteps]

    Thinking Of Selling Your Property? Read This First

    Sellers, it’s time. We need your inventory, and look how happy you could be!

    Alex thanks for selling my home as quickly and painless as possible at a price way beyond my expectation! I especially liked that you provided expert advice/service from staging, lighting and photography to make this a success. Using [electronic signature solutions] for all document signing made my life so much easier, and not to mention saving wasted paper from going into the environment. You keep up with the latest trends, you have access to new and potential audience/followers via social networking sites, and you’re just damn good at what you do so, THANKS!!!!

    Cheers,
    Judy

    Brings a tear to one’s eye, doesn’t it. You’re welcome Judy! Thanks for the great testimonial. Call us when you’re ready to buy.

    And to all of you other sellers, did you notice how good to the environment we can be? I’ll even come meet you on my bike. Just give a shout, and we’ll get the ball rolling to getting you top dollar on your property too.

    -More Testimonials [theFrontSteps]
    -Maximum Overbid Of The Week: 235 28th St, Noe Valley [theFrontSteps]

    Maximum Overbid Of The Week: 235 28th Street, Noe Valley…

    This one is hot off the presses. So hot, this property at 235 28th Street in Noe Valley still has dust billowing up around it from the flurry of bidding that just went down.

    235noefacade

    235noekitchen

    235noerear
    By all accounts, this is a great, great house. Sure, it needs a little work, but could be really nice and totally livable with ripped up carpet and buffed out floors, new paint (get rid of the wallpaper), and tidy up the yard. It’s actually livable now, but we have champagne tastes like all of you. To take it even further, the house could be expanded down, up and back. Big project for sure, protect that lovely historical facade, dig out the downstairs, add one more parking spot, and go big…and that’s exactly what all of you, dear readers/buyers, can expect to hit the market in or around another year, and expect it to be in the $3,000,000 range.

    We just bid on this property, and we lost. Asking $899,000, we bid $1,250,000, we were “in the top four”. Winning bid (hate that word) was $1,300,000, cash, seven day close. That’s $401,000 over asking. Hard to beat. And for our buyers, it’s another one lost. It stings just as bad this time (the 7th) as it did the first.

    To all you sellers, we keep saying it’s a great time to sell, are you believing us yet?

    -235 28th Street, Noe Valley: 3bd, 1ba, $899,000 [MLS]
    -When Someone Else Tells You Our Market Is Hot Will You Listen? [theFrontSteps]
    -Telegraph Hill Neighbors: Our Opposition Is Unconditional [theFrontSteps]

    The Ultimate Agent Photo Fail X 6…Actually X 7

    If you saw our recent post about the house with all that fabulous ($302,000 worth of) furniture for sale, none of which you got to see in the marketing, you might have been just as curious as us about said furniture.

    Lucky for all of us (lest curiosity killed this cat), we dug a little deeper and found that the previous listing holds all the answers. The furniture is there, and….well, it’s furniture, so whatevs. But what’s really awesome is how many times you get to see the agent’s photo ghost. Six times! (Seven if you count the double mirror shot.)

    We can hear the conversation now, “It’s such a hot market all you gotta do is slap a sign out front and throw it on MLS.” Not true. So not true. There is an art to multiple offers and Maximum Overbids. And there is clearly a new art of agent marketing and self promotion we have yet to discover.

    -$302,000 Worth Of Furniture Comes With This House…Sort Of [theFrontSteps]
    -San Francisco’s Sexiest Realtor 2009 [theFrontSteps]

    $302,000 Worth Of Furniture Comes With This House…Sort Of

    Originally listed for sale in the Fall of 2012 for $1,850,000, price chopped, relisted a mere 11 days ago, now asking $1,798,000, this property apparently has an “expansive, unobstructed view of the City and the bay”, but that’s not all.

    From the “agent only” remarks we occasionally can’t help but to share with you. It’s a “beautifully remodeled home in Diamond Heights, with the option to buy the house furnished for $2,100,000.00. Show this house blind.”

    21ora

    Are we the only ones that are confused by the marketing of a home that apparently has a fabulous remodel, great views, and great furniture ($302,000 worth), none of which we get to see?

    Oh…hold on, hold on, hold on. It’s there…”Show this house blind“. Now we get it.

    -21 Ora, San Francisco [MLS]

    Hey Buyers! Turns Out There’s More Inventory Than You Thought

    Have a look at what hit our email in the past couple months, and the companies heavily marketing “pocket listings”, “off market” property, or “not on MLS” opportunities.

    You, the buyer, would probably like to know about these opportunities, wouldn’t you? Well…you can’t. Not until these brokerages wake up and join the year 2013, move beyond “private” or internal email as the method of choice for delivering these opportunities, look to social networks for some guidance as to where the buying (and selling) public lives, and get with the program!

    Pacific Union, McGuire, Zephyr, Paragon, TRI Coldwell Banker, Vanguard, Sotheby’s, the list goes on and on…you ALL have pocket listings, and you’re all marketing them “privately”, so let’s make an effort to encourage each other to participate in an alternative marketplace to bring these opportunities to your fellow agents and the public, rather than continuing to shove this growing marketplace under the massive bureaucratic rug that is our National, State, and Local Association of Realtors. And for heaven’s sake, quit throwing your colleagues (Climb Real Estate) under the bus for taking a step in the right direction! (You know who you are.) It’s high time an alternative to the MLS takes shape, and the opportunity is right here and now.

    [The same properties shown above, with links to the site:]
    -Dominican Estate [Decker Bullock/Sothebys]
    -53 Clifford Terrace [Vanguard]
    -1299 Bush Street [Vanguard]
    -219 Brannan [Vanguard]
    -524 Roosevelt [Vanguard]
    -2876 25th Ave [Vanguard]
    -466 Hill [Vanguard]
    -2509 Polk [McGuire]
    -855 Folsom [McGuire]
    -2094 Bush [McGuire]
    -66 Parker [McGuire]
    -2200 Pacific [McGuire]
    -171 Caznea [McGuire]
    -615 Buena Vista West [Sotheby's]
    -2245 Francisco [Sotheby's]
    -29 Oak Springs [Sotheby's]
    -26 Sanford Lane [Pacific Union]
    -1200 Laguna [Zephyr]
    -1278 Stanyan [Zephyr]
    -50 Lansing [Zephyr]
    -Nob Hill Secret address [TRI Coldwell Banker]
    -2325 Divisadero [TRI Coldwell Banker]
    -2220 Sacramento [TRI Coldwell Banker]
    -465 10th St [TRI Coldwell Banker]
    -6 Emlin, Kentfield [TRI Coldwell Banker]
    -595 12th Ave [TRI Coldwell Banker]
    -850 Powell [TRI Coldwell Banker]
    -287 Mangels [Barbegelata]

    [Editor's Note: Some of these properties were placed on PocketListings.net, and others have since hit MLS and are now sold, but they did land in our email a very short time ago. You can expect some of these links to be killed by day's end, due to panicking brokerages.
    Finally, if you'd like to be alerted when these opportunities hit our inbox, drop us a line, and we'll figure out a way to get them to you.]

    -PocketListings.net: How To Tutorial [blog.pocketlistings.net]
    -Climb Real Estate, PocketListings.net Join To Bring You More Buying And Selling Opportunity [theFrontSteps]
    -It’s not listed, but it’s definitely for sale [New York Times]
    -Remaking Real Estate, Again [SF Gate]