Something For You Fence Sitters And Gold Panners To Ponder…

1761hayes

My clients just got shelled by 16 other offers on 1761 Hayes, a top floor 2 bed, 1 bath condo in NOPA asking $849,000. We offered $1,051,000, and they accepted an offer that was “barely higher”. So here’s a thought:

I’d say it’s time for many of you long time residents sitting on the selling fence to pack it up, cash out, and head for greener pastures where the $$$ you make on your sale can buy you acres of space, money in the bank, and plenty of breathing room. I’d even suggest all of you gold panner techies flocking to SF looking to strike it rich consider building another hub for tech activity somewhere else. Don’t get me wrong, I love all of you, many of you are my clients, we love what you’re doing for the economy (for that matter, the world), and there is a reason everyone wants to be in San Francisco, but at some point, I’d think even you, the innovators, would get tired of throwing your money at sellers and it still not being enough. Surely, the internet works in other locales around the world, and surely companies can be built and go viral from anywhere. Perhaps the companies that are leading the innovation now should open satellite offices in markets where their talent can afford to live? I know Oregon, Seattle, and Salt Lake City have a reasonable real estate market, as well as hip scene. Makes perfect sense to me, and might ease the frenzy that is San Francisco real estate. What do you think?

On a side note (somewhat related to technology): in case you aren’t on the VIP list, and you’re stuck waiting in line for your real estate agent to send you stale data via snail mail about recent sales in your ‘hood, comps that by the time they reach you are old news, I published yet another issue of sfnewsletter last week, and it’s chock full of good real estate porn, including a few good overbids you’ll want to share amongst friends, and a link to the stuff you really want: real time market data sortable by neighborhood and property type (courtesy of The Goods-SF).

Get on the list at sfnewsletter.com. Get out of town with money in the bank by giving me a shout (alexclark@gmail.com, 415-254-5351).

-1761 Hayes Property Detail [theGoods-sf.com]

Possible Shift In San Francisco Real Estate Market? Should You Sell Your Home Now?

February 2014 San Francisco Market Report

It is far too early in the year to reach definitive conclusions regarding substantive changes in the market, but there are indications of a number of shifts. From the hurly burly on the street, the word is that the quantity of offers coming in on new listings is declining. Where a new listing might have attracted 10 or 12 offers last spring, 3 or 4 are coming in now; where 3 or 4 offers would have arrived, the seller is getting 1. And, according to Broker Metrics, for every 2 listings that offers in December and January, another listing expired or was withdrawn without selling.

The amount of competition deeply affects home price increases.

There are still a very large number of buyers looking at listings online and at open houses. But more of them appear to be first-time buyers and they are proceeding more cautiously. Some buyers are burned out on the multiple-offer bidding frenzies of last year and are reluctant to participate in them. Though the market remains hot by any reasonable standard, by some statistical measures it is cooling. This may reflect a transition or only a lull before the spring sales season begins.

Recently, the investment-property analysis firm Reis speculated that SF apartment-rent growth — which has been extraordinary by any measure, especially in a period of low inflation — will slow despite intense demand and very low vacancy rates, simply because people can’t pay any more. It’s an idea which may or may not be correct or apply to other types of housing costs. Rent rates do play a role in purchase prices as buyers often compare the net housing costs of the two options.

Median Sales Price Appreciation by Neighborhood

In San Francisco, some of the most affluent neighborhoods — such as the Pacific Heights-Marina district and the Noe, Eureka and Cole Valleys district — started their recoveries in the second half of 2011, well before virtually every place else in the city or country. When 2012 began, prices in these districts soared, while other areas played catch up. In 2013, that dynamic flipped: Appreciation rates in comparatively less expensive neighborhoods surged, while slowing in the most affluent areas.

A big part of this is simple affordability: Priced out in one neighborhood (or city), buyers focused on others, similar in ambiance but less costly. Home prices there looked so good in comparison that buyers were willing to bid them up. The huge decline of distressed sales in areas severely affected, such as in Bayview, has had an outsized effect on median sales prices there. Continuing gentrification, as in the Mission, and increasing “luxury” condo construction in less affluent areas have also played parts in this trend. It’s not as if demand plunged in the Pacific Heights-Marina district (or Noe Valley, for that matter). Quite the contrary: its 9% appreciation rate in 2013 translated into the city’s largest median price increase in dollar terms ($300,000). However, in the previous year, this district saw year over year median price appreciation of 25%.

Note that median price appreciation does not perfectly correlate to changes in home values, as it can be affected by a variety of market factors. It does give an approximate sense of market trends.
Continue reading

Top 10 Overbids Of The Week, And One Mind Bender On Church That Wouldn’t Even Make The List

[Update: Most recent Overbids can be found here, and delivered to you biweekly via email at sfnewsletter.com]

Before we get down to the top 10, I thought you all might like a bit of first hand story to ponder over lunch or dinner with your friends.

This property: 1850 Church, technically in Glen Park, practically in Noe Valley.
1850church
It is a top floor, three bedroom, two bath, down to the studs remodel including moving the bedrooms from the back of the house to the front, moving kitchen to the back, blowing out walls, opening up space, adding a deck, and basically making it awesome…and it has two car parking and a yard. For all practical purposes, it’s pretty sweet. It is however bordered by a shack on the right and left of the property, which can either lend to its appeal or detract, depending on your tolerance for jungle overgrowth. But enough about that. What happened?

Listed for $1,195,000, maybe a bit low, but probably pretty fair, all reasonable comps suggested a sales price in the high $1.2s to mid $1.3s. Single family homes are selling for that, and this is a condo! After all the dust settled, there were seven offers. My clients wrote at $1,350,000, my colleague’s clients wrote at $1,410,000 (You doing the math? That’s already $215,000 over asking.), and neither of us won. Go figure. So any day this property is going to close at $1,435,000 with a cash offer that came with zero contingencies, which equates to $240,000 over the asking price, and right into the range of insanity. Exact square footage is not known, but a ballpark would put this property to at least $1000/psf, and at 20% over asking, it doesn’t even get on the top 10 list!

Isolated incident? Sadly no. The pattern is the same. Buyer loses once. Buyer loses twice. Buyer loses three times or more. Buyer gets fed up, goes crazy big, blows our minds, blows everyone else out of the water, and sets the bar that much higher for the next. It’s a vicious cycle we’re in.

In case one anecdotal sale isn’t enough for you, I present San Francisco’s top 10 Overbids of the week.

Address BR/BA/Units DOM List Price Sold Price Overbid
2820 Sacramento St 2822 2-4 Units 11 $1,825,000 $2,550,000 39.73%
360 Guerrero St 1/1.00/404 11 $599,000 $780,000 30.22%
1013 Rhode Island St 2/2.00/N/A 9 $1,099,000 $1,410,000 28.30%
125 Bella Vista Way 3/2.00/N/A 42 $749,000 $960,000 28.17%
664 Teresita Blvd 2/1.00/N/A 9 $699,000 $891,000 27.47%
26 Pleasant St 30 2-4 Units 75 $2,395,000 $3,020,000 26.10%
1335 31st Ave 2/2.00/N/A 14 $795,000 $1,000,000 25.79%
415 Missouri St 3/1.00/ 19 $995,000 $1,250,000 25.63%
3380 22nd St 3/1.00/ 70 $849,000 $1,060,000 24.85%
2446 17th Ave 3/2.00/N/A 15 $729,000 $908,000 24.55%

So when will this madness end? I’m guessing not anytime soon. I’ve been saying it’s a great time to be a seller, but if you’re a seller needing to buy in San Francisco and stay here, not so fun.

To you out of town readers that have waited for your time to unload your SF property, are you going to keep rolling the dice and bet things get hotter, or get out while the gettin’s good?

-1850 Church [Property Detail]
-Noe Valley, Glen Park comps for 1850 Church [MLS]
-Overbids you may have missed [theFrontSteps]

Just Sold! 1622-1626 Great Highway: Save The Waves Coalition Gets A Check

I am happy to say I just represented part of the buying group for this wonderful property on the Great Highway. You may remember the post my colleague did about 1622-1626 Great Highway (Ghost of Sunset Past: The Moss Flats)? Originally listed for $1,349,000 our clients got it for LESS THAN ASKING (it can be done). It’s a done deal at $1,265,000, and everyone is happy, including Save The Waves Coalition, a group dedicated to protecting our oceans, beaches, and waves.

In case you haven’t heard, every transaction I will donate a portion of my commission to the charity/nonprofit of my clients’ choosing, and my clients this time chose Save The Waves. If any of you at Save The Waves are reading, the check is in the mail!


Congratulations to our buyers. This is a great property in an awesome location.

I am available to help you, your friends, and your family with all of your real estate needs, and I am feeling really good about now giving a portion of every sale to charity/nonprofit, so help me do more!

-Ghost of Sunset Past: The Moss Flats [theFrontSteps]
-1622-1626 Great Highway Details [theGoods-sf.com]

DECEMBER 2013 SAN FRANCISCO CONDOMINIUM PRICES INCREASE 18 PERCENT OVER PREVIOUS YEAR

San Francisco condominium prices rose 18 percent in December 2013 over the previous year, according to the Condominium Pricing Index released today by The Mark Company, a leading urban residential marketing and sales firm.

The Mark Company Condominium Pricing Index for December was $1,034 per square foot, which is up 2 percent from November. New construction inventory was 78 percent lower than a year ago, and down 26 percent from the previous month, with 92 units currently available.

“With fewer than 100 new condominiums now for sale in San Francisco, price appreciation is likely to continue in 2014,” states Erin Kennelly, senior director of research, The Mark Company.

The Condominium Pricing Index, part of the firm’s monthly Trend Sheet (available at www.themarkcompany.com), represents the price per square foot of a new 10th floor, 1,000-square-foot condominium. It is based on recent sales data, and uses a proprietary quantitative method to measure trends in market demand. It tracks the value of a new construction condominium without the volatility of inventory changes.

The Mark Company Penthouse Pricing Index, which applies the same methodology to a new 30th floor, 2,000-square-foot condominium, was $1,776 per square foot, up 18 percent year over year.

The condominium price per square foot was $868 for resales, up 26 percent over December 2012, according to The Mark Company Trend Sheet for San Francisco. In addition, there were 229 condominium resales in San Francisco in December, 134 active condominium listings representing less than one month of inventory, and 123 pending condominium units, the Trend Sheet found.

That’s some pretty insane growth and is not surprising. Thanks Mark Company for the info.

San Francisco Drug Dealing, Violent and Property Crimes…All In One Map

Zoom in, zoom out, click here, click there. Sort by day or night, by area or population. Get down and dirty with recent (and past) crimes committed in your area, or an area you plan on living. Find out what crimes were committed, when, and exactly where. It’s exactly these types of maps that could very well set your mind at ease, or send you running to the suburbs. They certainly do provide a fair bit of education, that’s for sure.

Spoiler alert: Tenderloin wins with the most crimes per square mile, per year, than any other part of the city! (Are you really surprised?)

crimemapcity

It would appear the Outer Sunset is the safest part of town, and it would also appear if you plan on visiting the Cliff House or walk Land’s End trail, you should either not take your car, or not take your car…there is an incredibly high rate of car break ins there. Not too surprising if you consider the number of tourists in that area leaving valuables and luggage clearly visible in their rental car. Anyway, enjoy, and thanks to the developer of this fine map for introducing me, and you, to it.

-CityCrimeMaps.com
-Outer Sunset [theFrontSteps]

SOLD! 1471 McAllister

I am pleased to say, I just helped my clients secure this wonderful property in the Alamo Square (bordered by and often referred to as NOPA) area of San Francisco, located at 1471 McAllister. It’s a fabulous 3 bed, 2 bath property in an extremely awesome location, and we are thrilled to say we “won” this most competitive offer situation.

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List price: $995,000

What Your Realtor Should Really Be Sending You…The Goods

I am pleased to announce the launch, and early adoption by Paragon Real Estate Group, of the newest addition to the San Francisco real estate scene “The Goods“, real estate marketing made simple.

The goal of this new offering is to make it easy for real estate agents in the San Francisco/Bay Area to provide their clients with what they need, and should expect, from their agent…time sensitive, factual, market data that pertains to the area in which their property is located, or the area where they would like to be. We’d like to put an end to unnecessary print marketing (think of the trees!), stop the sending of mugshot branded magnets, notepads, Zagat Guides, coffee mugs, and all the other crap clients don’t need, or necessarily want from their real estate agent. Keep in front of your clients with valuable real-time market data they can use.

The Goods will provide your company with a new link every two weeks to newly listed, as well as recently sold property data your clients can browse by location, property type, price, beds, baths and DOM. You can include the link in your marketing pieces, and also receive a raw html snippet/preview of the data to include in your marketing, inviting your clients to click through and track sales in their area.

Paragon Real Estate Group is the first to adopt and use this great new product for their agents’ clients, and positive feedback is already rolling in.

-The Goods is a terrific tool for our agents to deliver to our clients: It’s fast and easy to use and it provides our clients with extremely timely and valuable information about new listings and what’s selling in the market, which is at the top of the list of resources our clients want most from us. -Patrick Carlisle, Chief Marketing Analyst, Director of Business Development, Paragon Real Estate Group

Here is a sample of how Paragon incorporates it into their marketing. You’ll notice they call it “Market Watch”. You can call it whatever you like.
ParagonMarketWatch

In this age of Zillow, Trulia, Redfin, and the countless apps hitting the market which afford your clients the luxury of tracking the market without your help, you can’t afford to let this opportunity slip you by. Brokers of every company in the Bay Area should be jumping on this offering, as simply put…it’s a no-brainer.

For more information about The Goods, visit www.theGoods-SF.com.

Ghosts of Sunset Past: The Moss Flats

Imagine an Outer Sunset made up entirely of sand dunes, streetcars repurposed as oceanfront homes and clubhouses, bohemians having all-night parties that include midnight swims in the icy Pacific and this:

Charles Depew, late of Saginaw, Michigan, built 1626 Great Highway in 1908, minus an architect but likely inspired by Bernard Maybeck. The three-flat building, known as “The Moss Flats,” has survived long enough to join the National Register of Historic Places, decades after the last of its colorful, ramshackle neighbors dissolved into dust. It’s on the market, listed for $1.349 by similarly old San Francisco school agency Barbagelata.

Outside are the maybe-Maybeck-inspired shingles; inside are three two-bedroom tenant-occupied flats decorated in surfer chic:

1626_GH_2_100913

Plus ocean views from the top-most unit. Longtime owners, plus longtime rental units, plus longtime exposure to salty ocean air may be a caveat in this case, but assuming the owner of the last standing evidence of Carville has no immediate plans to sell, this is your best chance to get into a pre-Doelger Outer Sunset historic property, steps from the beach and with a steady, proven income flow.

-Article by Larry Rosen: Contributing writer and San Francisco local sharing his thoughts with theFrontSteps.

 

Five White-Hot Districts In A Red-Hot San Francisco Real Estate Market

July 2013 Special Report

Virtually every area of San Francisco and the Bay Area has been experiencing dramatic home-value appreciation in the past 12 to 18 months. Some that were hard hit by distressed property sales, which experienced the largest price declines, have surged in price but remain 20% – 30% below previous peak values reached in 2006 – 2008. As a state, California is still about 25% below its 2007 pre-crash median home price. And in San Francisco itself, many if not most neighborhoods now appear to have re-attained or moved slightly beyond previous high points.

But in this past quarter, a handful of neighborhoods and districts in the city have leapt well beyond the highest average home values achieved in the past. Interestingly, comparing these white-hot areas with one another, there are often huge differences in property type, era and style of construction, and neighborhood culture or ambiance. But all of them have been very affected by affluent – often newly affluent – high-tech professionals of one age group and level of affluence or another. Naturally, these neighborhoods are highly desired by other buyers too – often professionals in finance, bio-tech, medicine and law – but the high-tech-buyer dynamic has generally super-charged these markets in particular.

However, please note that the difference we’re talking about between these neighborhoods and the rest of the city is between white hot and red hot: Quite honestly, they’re all very hot markets right now.

The Inner Mission 

Super hot, super hip, generally young: this neighborhood has seen very dramatic changes since the early nineties as a classic process of gentrification occurred — changes which have recently accelerated. Houses here are often large, classic Victorians, while the condos are mostly modern, built within the last decade or so. This area has a large, vibrant and diverse commercial district centered around Mission and Valencia Streets, but is still close to Noe Valley and the Castro. This chart focuses on the condo market, in which values are approximately 15% above the previous peak.

Noe Valley – Eureka Valley (Castro) – Dolores Heights 

These neighborhoods are part of a district that includes Cole Valley, Ashbury Heights, Clarendon & Corona Heights, Duboce Triangle, Mission Dolores and Glen Park, all of which have seen enormous recent appreciation. Housing here is typically older, built in the first 4 decades of the last century; there are many parks for kids and pets; the streets are tree-lined and the ambiance of the neighborhoods is relaxed and family friendly. This district surged in popularity and price in the mid-late nineties, was one of the last to peak in value in 2008, and has been at the forefront of the market rebound which started early here, in 2011. Among other advantages, it has relatively easy access to highways south to Silicon Valley. The district also has a large condo market, but this chart focuses on house values.

South Beach & Yerba Buena 

After the Embarcadero freeway came down in 1991 and then AT&T Park built in 2000, this area changed from a place for B-class offices and car stereo installations to the home of some of the most dramatic and expensive condo and loft buildings in the country. More condos are now sold here than anyplace else in the city and high-floor units with staggering views often sell for millions of dollars – one sold for $28 million. It’s popular with a number of demographics – high-tech and bio-tech workers working in offices nearby in SoMa and Mission Bay, financial district professionals, and empty-nesters who want to enjoy city life and have all the amenities, but without the responsibility of maintaining a house. Affluent foreign buyers are also a significant segment. Its neighborhood ambiance is very urban. This chart is for condos below the price of $1,800,000, but the dynamic for ultra-luxury condos is also white hot, with an average dollar per square foot value of over $1200.

Bernal Heights 

Like Noe Valley and Glen Park, Bernal Heights was originally a blue-collar neighborhood filled with Victorian houses. Noe Valley soared in value first, becoming wildly popular, and now people who want a similar family-friendly neighborhood ambiance, but at a more affordable cost, have increasingly turned to Bernal Heights. It also has easy access to highways south to the peninsula.

 

Hayes Valley-North of Panhandle (NoPa)-Alamo Square

This condo market is made up of two totally different types: Edwardian flats that have been turned into condos and brand new, ultra-modern condo developments. The Hayes Valley commercial district is very hot and hip, similar to, but still different from the Mission’s Valencia Street. Buyers who are priced out of the nearby Cole Valley-Haight Ashbury condo market often look here for a similar neighborhood ambiance at lower cost. Hayes Valley is also close to the Civic Center cultural cluster of museum, opera, symphony, ballet and other performing arts, which appeals to another buyer demographic as well.

To put all of these charts into one simple suggestion: It’s a great time to sell your property in San Francisco, and our market desperately needs the inventory!

If you have questions or would like information regarding a neighborhood not listed above, please contact us.

Renderings Revealed For Vacant Corner Lot Development Opportunity At 1000 Broadway, Russian Hill… Bids Due Sealed

What it is now:
100broadstreet

What it could be:
1000Broadway

The view you might see:
100broadwaydiningrm
The Deets:

“The property consists of 5,415 square feet of vacant land slated for subdivision and situated on the northwest corner of Broadway and Taylor Streets. The property offers spectacular views over San Francisco, including North Beach, the Financial District, the Bay Bridge and the San Francisco Bay. The site is flanked on two sides by a stately historic wall.

The proposed development dubbed “Wysteria” consists of two luxury single-family homes, each on its own fee-simple lot, facing Broadway Street. It also includes a building containing two luxury townhome condominiums to be built on a third lot on Taylor Street. Designated site addresses will be 1000 Broadway, 1010 Broadway, 1601 Taylor and 1625 Taylor Street.

The project was designed by renowned architectural firm Page & Turnbull. For over thirty years, Page & Turnbull has served as the preservation architect for numerous National Register and locally recognized landmarks. Their work has been honored by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, American Institute of Architects, California Preservation Foundation and other national, regional and local organizations.

This property is one of the few remaining developable lots on the northern rim of San Francisco. The property is situated among many gracious single family homes and classic Arts and Crafts, Mediterranean, Edwardian and Victorian buildings.”

Talk about a prime opportunity in an A+ location…

Sealed bids are due August 1st, and you heard it here first.

-Wysteria Residences [website]

REALLY Expensive Real Estate…Like $35,000,000

Twenty-nine fifty Broadway sold “off market” last month for $35,000,000.

2950BroadwayFacade
[Photo Source: SocketSite]

As reported on SocketSite today:
“Hidden behind non-disclosure agreements and tax records stamped “DO NOT FILM,” you’re not supposed to know about the sale of 2950 Broadway which was purchased for $29,500,000 in 2011, remodeled a little last year, and very quietly sold off the market last month. But now you know. And you’re about to know the record setting sale price as well.

With a sale price of $35,000,000 (roughly $3,182 per square foot) and $875,000 in transfer tax confidentially paid, 2950 Broadway has just displaced 2840 Broadway to become the most expensive single-family home ever sold in San Francisco.”

Wow…and some people will wonder and cry foul that it never hit the MLS.

Thinking Of Selling Your Property? Read This First

Sellers, it’s time. We need your inventory, and look how happy you could be!

Alex thanks for selling my home as quickly and painless as possible at a price way beyond my expectation! I especially liked that you provided expert advice/service from staging, lighting and photography to make this a success. Using [electronic signature solutions] for all document signing made my life so much easier, and not to mention saving wasted paper from going into the environment. You keep up with the latest trends, you have access to new and potential audience/followers via social networking sites, and you’re just damn good at what you do so, THANKS!!!!

Cheers,
Judy

Brings a tear to one’s eye, doesn’t it. You’re welcome Judy! Thanks for the great testimonial. Call us when you’re ready to buy.

And to all of you other sellers, did you notice how good to the environment we can be? I’ll even come meet you on my bike. Just give a shout, and we’ll get the ball rolling to getting you top dollar on your property too.

-More Testimonials [theFrontSteps]
-Maximum Overbid Of The Week: 235 28th St, Noe Valley [theFrontSteps]

Maximum Overbid Of The Week: 235 28th Street, Noe Valley…

This one is hot off the presses. So hot, this property at 235 28th Street in Noe Valley still has dust billowing up around it from the flurry of bidding that just went down.

235noefacade

235noekitchen

235noerear
By all accounts, this is a great, great house. Sure, it needs a little work, but could be really nice and totally livable with ripped up carpet and buffed out floors, new paint (get rid of the wallpaper), and tidy up the yard. It’s actually livable now, but we have champagne tastes like all of you. To take it even further, the house could be expanded down, up and back. Big project for sure, protect that lovely historical facade, dig out the downstairs, add one more parking spot, and go big…and that’s exactly what all of you, dear readers/buyers, can expect to hit the market in or around another year, and expect it to be in the $3,000,000 range.

We just bid on this property, and we lost. Asking $899,000, we bid $1,250,000, we were “in the top four”. Winning bid (hate that word) was $1,300,000, cash, seven day close. That’s $401,000 over asking. Hard to beat. And for our buyers, it’s another one lost. It stings just as bad this time (the 7th) as it did the first.

To all you sellers, we keep saying it’s a great time to sell, are you believing us yet?

-235 28th Street, Noe Valley: 3bd, 1ba, $899,000 [MLS]
-When Someone Else Tells You Our Market Is Hot Will You Listen? [theFrontSteps]
-Telegraph Hill Neighbors: Our Opposition Is Unconditional [theFrontSteps]

Telegraph Hill Neighbors: “Our Opposition Is Unconditional”

Ahhh….neighbors. You love ‘em. You hate ‘em. You can’t live in San Francisco without ‘em, and you certainly can’t easily remodel a home to today’s standards without opposition from them. Check out what just hit our inbox:
telhill1small1
If, for some reason, you can’t see the letter, which we uploaded as an image, we’ll go ahead and tell ya what it says:

Dear Mr. [deleted]:
We are neighbors on Telegraph Hill who will oppose any changes to the building envelope at [deleted] owned by [deleted] in this historic district of Telegraph Hill. While the Hill has suffered through renovations in the past, projects such as yours have occurred with extreme environmental changes. Water drainage issues on Telegraph Hill regarding a nearby project created unfavorable slope instability–buildings have been lost and a large boulder ended up on Sansome Street. Additionally, neighbors on [deleted] and surrounds are tired of construction noise and delays in completion caused by projects such as yours. A recent project took 10 years and is still incomplete.

Telegraph Hill is a historic district whose character depends upon building ownership which understands the value of building enhancement not as building expansion, but building enhancement as careful care in keeping up properties in their historic dimension. We find your application to be sadly ignorant of the need to abide by the common elements vital to the neighborhood and its character.

Your proposal to enhance the property needs to be cognizant of the historic preservation without additional elevation or facade changes in all directions. Projects like yours have been attempted in the past and have turned out badly.

While we many of us may be away during your pre-application meeting time, please understand that our opposition is unconditional.

Sincerely,
Your neighbors and friends on Telegraph Hill
[Thirteen names deleted]

Just another bump in the road for a developer out there trying to bring a home that has sat vacant since WWII (yes, that long) into our housing stock…before it falls off the hill or gets consumed by the pests and rodents feasting on its rotting self. But Hey! It’s “historic”.

[Update: We're told none of the authors of this letter took the time to actually visit the property at the open house outreach, and none have contacted the developer, or the architect (aside from this letter) to begin a dialogue of constructive or courteous negotiations.]

You gotta love San Francisco and all the righteousness it preserves…

-Telegraph Hill Landslide forces 120 from homes… [SFGate]
-San Francisco Neighborhoods prone to liquefaction…[theFrontSteps]

From Vacant Lot To Contemporary Home In Eight Short Months: 2192 Funston Ave

What was…

2192Funston

Is now…

2192 Funston Ave, San Francisco CA

But not yet…

Look for this to hit MLS any day, unless someone goes and knocks the seller’s socks off with a big time offer between now and this weekend. Sold in May of 2012 for $489,000 as a “Great opportunity for a developer to build a stunning 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath single family home in highly coveted Golden Gate Heights, [with] shovel-ready approved plans for a single family home in excess of 3,000 sqft, elevator, sauna, 2 car garage, deck, and much more!”

It’s now touted as “a newly constructed contemporary home with panoramic views on a quiet Golden Gate Heights cul-de-sac. [And this] chic and modern beauty is wonderfully laid out on five levels. The stairs are beautiful, especially with the glass paneled railings that create an open and airy sense of space. Too tired to walk up stairs? No worries — that’s what the elevator is for!”

From the looks of the pictures provided by Open Homes Photography, and the minimalist approach to maximizing the views, we’re very curios to see how this $1,680,000 four bedroom, three and one half bath home does in this oh so hot market of ours…especially since it may be one of the few (or only) vacant lots turned single family home west of Twin Peaks with an elevator…and did we mention the views?!

Make sure to check the interactive floor plans, and get yourself out there this weekend to have a look. It’s not something you see everyday in that neck of the woods, and so far, you’re one of the first to know it even exists.

2192 Funston Floor Plan

-2192 Funston, $1,680,000, 4bd, 3.5ba [Property Website]
-New Listed, Newly Sold [theFrontSteps]

Live in San Francisco’s NOPA District In This Fabulous Top Floor View Condo

Have aspirations to live in the oh so hip NOPA district of San Francisco? Been searching for a single family home in NOPA, but just can’t afford one? You’re in luck, as thankfully San Francisco always has an alternative for you, and 22 Loyola Terrace is no exception.

Photos and details are here now.

Technically mapped in San Francisco’s Lone Mountain neighborhood, 22 Loyola Terrace is one cute cul-de sac a stone’s throw from the heart center of NOPA, close to Haight, down the hill from USF, around the hill from Laurel Village, and a short par 3 away from Golden Gate Park. It’s most definitely stumbling distance to Bistro Gambrinus, 1/2 block from Papalote, and certainly walking distance to Matching Half Cafe (because Starbucks on the corner of Fulton and Masonic should be avoided). It gets better…there is a new place to try on the corner of Geary and Masonic called The Corner Store (Remember the Hukilau? Right there.) They serve brunch, lunch, dinner, and have a soda fountain (such the rage).

This top floor, two level, three plus bedroom condominium could easily trick you into thinking it’s a single family home, but alas…it is not. Homeowner’s dues are an incredibly low $193/month, the wood floors sparkle, the kitchen and baths have been updated, the decks and views are tremendous, the garage is massive (2 cars easily fit), there is additional storage, washer & dryer in the unit, and the creme de la creme…radiant heat, no hot air blowing in your skin to dry you out!

So if you, or anybody you know, has been looking for a single family home, or condominium anywhere near NOPA, Lone Mountain, Haight, Laurel Village, Cole Valley, or even Hayes Valley, this is one property you won’t want to miss. Spread the word far and wide, 22 Loyola Terrace is officially on the market, and ready for a new owner. Me thinks it should be you!

Open Houses will be held every Sunday from 2-4pm until it sells.

-22 Loyola Terrace, 3+ bed, 2 bath, 2 parking, 2 decks, 2 levels, 2 cool, $1,095,000 [MLS]

Millennium Tower, San Francisco California, “Top 10 Residential Buildings In The World”

There’s been a lot said from yours truly about Millennium Tower in the past. I’ve watched her grow and shared my stories and photos with all of you over the years. Millennium Tower was erected, sold like hotcakes during the pre 2009 boom, sold not like hotcakes during the bust…but she’s back, and buyers are gobbling up her remaining inventory at breakneck speed.

Recently named as one of the Top Ten Residential Buildings In The World by Worth Magazine, and featured in the Wall Street Journal in an article about Penthouse (not the magazine…the top floor residence) owner Tom Perkins (of Silicon Valley Fame), Millennium Tower sits alongside locations like One Hyde Park in London, Linked Hybrid in Beijing, and One57 in New York as an address many of the who’s who of big money and luxury proudly call home (or second home). Not impressed with that lineup?

Some other noteworthy residents rumored to have roamed the Club Level Amenity floor: Carmen Policy (San Francisco 49ers); Joe Montana (San Francisco 49ers); Peter Thiel (PayPal Co-founder); Russell Coutts (America’s Cup Skipper – legend in Sailing), and that’s just to name a few…

One bedroom units are completely sold out (from the sales office, you can occasionally grab a resale), 85% of the entire inventory has been sold, and your entry level price point is going to be around $1,600,000, but you gotta trust me when I say, you definitely get what you pay for (except deeded parking…in some cases, but that’s a different story).

The building is swank, debonair, and delightful in every sense of the word, and it’s certainly an address in San Francisco you can be proud of owning.

-Top Ten Residential Buildings In The World [Worth Magazine]
-A Penthouse Fit For A King [Wall Street Journal]
-All things Millennium Tower [theFrontSteps]
-Contact me if you’d like a private tour of any of the residences [alexclark@gmail.com]

22 Loyola Terrace: A Single Family, NOPA Alternative With Real Big Views For $1,095,000

Have aspirations to live in the oh so hip NOPA district of San Francisco? Been searching for a single family home in NOPA, but just can’t afford one? You’re in luck, as thankfully San Francisco always has an alternative for you, and 22 Loyola Terrace is no exception.

Technically mapped in San Francisco’s Lone Mountain neighborhood, 22 Loyola Terrace is one cute cul de sac practically in NOPA, close to Haight, down the hill from USF, around the hill from Laurel Village, and a short par 3 away from Golden Gate Park. It’s most definitely stumbling distance to Bistro Gambrinus, 1/2 block from Papalote, and certainly walking distance to Matching Half Cafe (because Starbucks on the corner of Fulton and Masonic should be avoided). It gets better…there is a new place to try on the corner of Geary and Masonic called The Corner Store (Remember the Hukilau? Right there.) They serve brunch, lunch, dinner, and have a soda fountain (such the rage).

This top floor, two level, three plus bedroom condominium could easily trick you into thinking it’s a single family home, but alas…it is not. Homeowner’s dues are an incredibly low $193/month, the wood floors sparkle, the kitchen and baths have been updated, the decks and views are tremendous, the garage is massive (2 cars easily fit), there is additional storage, washer & dryer in the unit, and the creme de la creme…radiant heat, no hot air blowing in your skin to dry you out!

So if you, or anybody you know, has been looking for a single family home, or condominium anywhere near NOPA, Lone Mountain, Haight, Laurel Village, Cole Valley, or even Hayes Valley, this is one property you won’t want to miss. Spread the word far and wide, 22 Loyola Terrace is officially on the market, and ready for a new owner. Me thinks it should be you!

-22 Loyola Terrace, 3+ bed, 2 bath, 2 parking, 2 decks, 2 levels, 2 cool, $1,095,000 [MLS]

139 Corbett, Asking $799,000, Receiving 30+ Offers: Where Will It Be When The Dust Settles?

At what point do you, dear fellow colleague and wonderful real estate companion, stop and say, “Okay, maybe I under-priced this property a bit, so I’ll just go ahead and raise the marketing price $100,000 now, so I don’t make a lot of agents and their buyers think they stand a snowball’s chance in hell of getting this property?”

Case in point, 139 Corbett, a Single Family Home in “Corona Heights” (we can just call this almost heart-center Castro), with three bedrooms, two baths, two car parking, expansion potential down, a yard, and big (nay, fantastic) VIEWS of Eureka Valley/Castro…asking $799,000:


There were 30+ offers! My client offered $932,000 and wasn’t even close. It’s certainly going to sell over $1,000,000, and I’d even guess a sales price close to $1,100,000…but “comps supported” a $799,000 list price? Really? Do you need 30 offers? Wouldn’t 10, or even two, offers be just as good?

Maddening. Truly maddening.

-139 Corbett, $799,000, 3bd, 2, ba, 2 pk [MLS]

Another Purdy Pocket Listing To Ponder In NOPA / Lone Mountain

This wonderful two-level single family alternative only a par 4 from the oh-so-hip NOPA district of San Francisco, and situated on the edge of the Lone Mountain district is currently listed off MLS until the sellers can find a suitable replacement property (if you know of any, don’t be shy). Asking $1,125,000, the home (its 3 beds, 2 baths, remodeled kitchen, fireplace, hardwood, steam heat, and charm) is truly awesome, as are the two decks, the views, the massive two car garage with heaps of additional storage, the east facing backyard, and the location.

If you, or anyone you know, is interested in more information about this property, click this link, and get the deets…

San Francisco Housing Market Continues to Strengthen

The San Francisco housing market continues to heat up, as evidenced by the increasing sale prices of homes in the city. Compared to one year ago, the median price for a single-family home rose by 10.6 percent to $785,000. And, with a limited supply of homes for sale, the city has remained a seller’s market, with aggressive bidding and multiple offers occurring regularly.

Single-Family Home Sales

Compared to May 2011, the city’s inventory of single-family homes for sale fell by 10.8 percent, while the number of homes under contract rose by 13.9 percent. During the same period, the number of homes sold increased by 23.3 percent.

For homes that were priced below $700,000, the months of supply inventory fell by 70.6 percent to a reading of 0.9. For higher-priced homes between $700,000 and $1.2 million, the months of supply inventory also dropped, by 52.7 percent to 1.1 months.

One area of the city which continues to experience healthy sales activity is Twin Peaks West, located in the mid-western part of town. Since May of last year, the number of homes under contract here has increased by 13.9 percent, while the number of homes sold has jumped by 23.3 percent, with 37 transactions closed. Twin Peaks West offers a variety of neighborhood communities, from the upscale and exclusive St. Francis Wood, to the charming mom and pop shops of the West Portal. Homes for sale here typically receive multiple offers and do not last on the market for very long. The median price for a home in Twin Peaks West is $918,000.

Another area of the city which experienced high sales activity is the northernmost district, which includes classic San Francisco neighborhoods such as the Marina and Pacific Heights. Compared to one year ago, the number of homes for sale in this region rose by 24.4 percent, being one of only three districts in the last month which experienced an increase in for-sale inventory. At the same time, the number of homes under contract increased by 18.8 percent, while the number of homes sold rose by 22.2 percent. Here you will find some of the most impressive views and properties in the city, and whose close proximity to Presidio Park and the waters of the San Francisco Bay, provide an endless array of outdoor recreational activities. The median price for a home here is $2,875,000.

Condominium Sales

In the same fashion as single-family homes, the inventory of condominiums for sale in the city dropped by 38.1 percent compared to May 2011. As a result, the number of condominiums under contract increased by 38.7 percent, while the number of condominiums sold rose by 9.1 percent.

For condominiums that were priced between $500,000 and $900,000, the months of supply inventory contracted by 72.5 percent to a reading of 0.9. For luxury condominiums priced above $900,000, the months of supply inventory also fell by 57.2 percent to 1.4 months.

One area of the city which experienced positive condominium sales activity is Downtown San Francisco, in the northeast section of town. Since May 2011, the number of condominiums under contract here increased by 4 percent to a total of 52 properties, making it the second highest district in the city with the greatest number of condominiums under contract. The number of condominiums sold also rose by 8.5 percent, with 51 units sold. Downtown San Francisco not only includes the center of the city’s commerce, it also features quintessential and historic San Francisco neighborhoods such as North Beach, or “Little Italy” as it is also commonly known, and Nob Hill, home to not only some of the city’s most luxurious condominiums, but also to a number of famous landmark hotels such as the Fairmont and Mark Hopkins. The median price for a condominium here is $734,333.

Outlook

The National Association of REALTORS® reports that, “Pending home sales retrenched in April following three consecutive monthly gains, but are notably higher than a year ago.” Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, said a one-month setback against a background of many months of gains does not change the fundamentally improving housing market conditions. “Home contract activity has been above year-ago levels now for 12 consecutive months. The housing recovery momentum continues,” he said.

The consumer confidence index, which had declined slightly in April, fell further in May. The index now stands at 64.9, down from a reading of 68.7 in April. Regarding the short-term outlook, Lynn Franco, director of the Conference Board Consumer Research Center, says that, “Consumers were less positive about current business and labor market conditions, and they were pessimistic about the short-term outlook. However, consumers were more upbeat about their income prospects, which should help sustain spending.”

According to the California Employment Development Department, California’s unemployment rate decreased to 10.8 percent in May, and nonfarm payrolls increased by 33,900 during the month for a total gain of 425,000 jobs since the recovery began in September 2009.

As reported earlier this month in the San Francisco Chronicle, “U.S. mortgage rates dropped to record lows for a sixth straight week as concerns over slowing job growth pushed investors into the safety of government bonds that guide interest costs. The average rate for a 30-year mortgage dropped to 3.67 percent from 3.75 percent in the week ended Thursday, Freddie Mac reported. It was the lowest rate in the mortgage-finance company’s records dating to 1971. The average 15-year rate declined to 2.94 percent, also a record, from 2.97 percent.”

Parkside Center Patio Home Hits The Market, Don’t Delay!

If you’ve been looking for a home in the Parkside neighborhood of San Francisco, I have just the one for you, 2186 33rd Ave @ Rivera ($795,000).

This home has been elegantly remodeled and meticulously maintained throughout. There is a large Living Room and Formal Dining Room, which opens into a wonderful center patio with skylights that seal off completely enabling you to enjoy the tranquility even on a rainy day. The living room has a corner fireplace and oak floors. The Beautiful kitchen has been wonderfully remodeled with Carrara Marble counters, cherry floor, stainless appliances and skylight. There are two spacious bedrooms and a full bath upstairs and large Master Suite with Full Bath downstairs. Whether you use the downstairs room as a master suite or office or media room, you can easily step outside into the lovely garden, or simply open the doors and let fresh air in. It is truly a wonderful home in an excellent location, that could be yours.

The home will be open for viewing every Sunday from 2-4pm until it is sold, and is available for private showings by appointment.

What are you waiting for! It’s not everyday a center patio home like this hits the market.

-2186 33rd Ave: 3bed, 2 bath, 1 parking, $795,000 [MLS]