Category Archives: Just plain fun

whiskey

Top 10 Whiskey Bars In San Francisco

Because talking about real estate ad nauseam gets boring, and we can all use a good Bourbon from time to time, I decided to do a top 10 Favorite locales to enjoy Whiskey/Bourbon in San Francisco. Get at it!

Whiskey, the brown liquid brimming with magical properties, is one of the best liquors around. If you agree and happen to be moving to the Bay Area then you’re in for a treat, because the city has some excellent whiskey-heavy haunts that should please even the snottiest of liquor snobs. If you’re in the mood for chatting with somebody over a smooth glass of single malt, then consider checking out the following 10 places.

Bourbon and Branch

Bourbon and Branch is one of the more unique venues in Tenderloin. It’s easy to fall in love with this place because of its prohibition theme, secret passwords, hidden rooms, costumed mixologists and an exclusive, speakeasy atmosphere. Plus, they have a modest collection of uncommon and rare liquors, and some of the best mixed drinks around.

Hours: Mon-Sat 6 pm – 2 am
Neighborhood: Civic Center / Tenderloin
Website: bourbonandbranch.com

Nihon Whiskey Lounge

If you’re looking for an intimate encounter with your glass of whiskey, then Nihon is the place to go. This Japanese-style whiskey haunt has one of the largest selections of single malt on the West Coast, and some good food to go alongside it. Plus, if you feel like one glass of special liquor isn’t enough, you can buy an entire bottle which gets put in a private locker until you return.

Hours: Tue-Sat 5:30 pm – 1:30 am
Neighborhood: Mission
Website: dajanigroup.net/establishments/nihon-whisky-lounge

Rickhouse

There is a reason GQ put Rickhouse on its best whiskey bars in the country 2013 list: it’s amazing. It’s the go-to haunt for an after work drink, particularly if you’re lucky enough to snag a seat at the bar. This place breathes whiskey, from its 300 Kentucky-imported barrels that make up the ceiling staves, to the walls in the back which are inspired by prohibition era distilleries.

Hours: Mon-Sat 6 pm – 2 am
Neighborhood: FiDi
Website: rickhousebar.com

Tradition

Another Bourbon and Branch whiskey house, this place is a wonderful stop, if for nothing more than they age their own barrels on the second floor. Plus, the place boasts more than 80 different cocktails, a knowledgeable staff and a traditional drinking atmosphere.

Hours: Mon-Sat 6 pm – 2 am
Neighborhood: Tenderloin
Website: tradbar.com

83 Proof

The signless 83 Proof is a wonderful bar, if you can find it. This hidden gem is quite literally hidden. It has no signage and it’s rather hard to find unless you know where you’re looking, which means the lounge is not nearly as crowded as its other popular counterparts.

Hours: Tue-Sat 2 pm – 2 am
Neighborhood: SOMA
Website: 83proof.com

Hard Water

If you’re craving rare bourbon and don’t mind being squished in this tiny hole-in-the-wall haunt, the Hard Water is where you want to be. This NOLA-themed place has the best options for rare bourbon by the flight in the city.

Hours: Mon-Sat 5 pm – 12 am
Neighborhood: Embarcadero
Website: hardwaterbar.com

Whiskey Thieves

If you’re looking for a more casual environment to enjoy your whiskey in, then Whiskey Thieves is the place to be. It boasts a relaxed, but substantial option of liquors, pool tables, jukeboxes, and affordable prices.

Hours: Mon-Fri 1 pm – 2 am; Sat-Sun 12 pm – 2 am
Neighborhood: Civic Center / Tenderloin
Website: Yelp Profile

Bloodhound

If you need a reprieve from the average yuppie San Francisco bar, then Bloodhound is your best bet. It’s themed as a country western lodge with leather sets, exposed wooden beams, hunting apparel decorating the walls and Edison light bulbs. The liquor selection is massive, and the pool table and old school jukebox finish off the rugged touch.

Hours: Mon-Sun 4 pm – 2 am
Neighborhood: SOMA
Website: bloodhoundsf.com

Swig

If you’re in the mood for a classy atmosphere to enjoy your glass of whiskey, then look no further than Swig. In the colder seasons the bar offers a pleasant fire to cozy up to, and an impressive selection of more than 150 whiskeys that span 80 years. The prices are not cheap, but it’s worth the splurge now and then.

Hours: Mon-Thu 4 pm – 1:30 pm; Fri-Sat 2 pm – 1:30 pm; Sun 5 pm – 1:30 pm
Neighborhood: Civic Center / Tenderloin
Website: swigbar.com

The Alembic

The Alembic is a small, tucked away narrow room that has an overwhelming list of excellent liquor choices. The bar specializes in getting you the perfect glass of bourbon, single malt scotch, American whiskey and Irish whiskey. If you’re feeling for something a little less straight forward, then try the new school and old school mixed options to liven things up.

Hours: Mon-Sun 12 pm – 2 am
Neighborhood: Haight Ashbury
Website: alembicbar.com

And of course, if you need a comrade, I’m a quick text message away.

Cheers!

larryellisontahoehome

Larry Ellison Sells Tahoe “Pad” for $20.3M | Inside Tim Lincecum’s $4M Arizona Abode

In case you like to follow your local celebs and what they’re doing with real estate:
insidelarryellisonstahoepad
-Larry Ellison Sells His Lake Tahoe Property for $20.35 Million [Wall Street Journal]

Not to be outdone:
timlincecumhome
Tim Lincecum’s Arizona Mansion just hit the market for $3,995,500 [San Francisco Business Times], but sadly it only comes with Basketball court and no batting cage.

It’s Pink And Red – Will The Sellers See The Green?

2625 Noriega: 3 bed, 2 bath, $850,000 and all the pink you could ever want – like ever.


This property is definitely not marketed to create the frenzy we’ve come to expect in this market, but will it make a difference in the final outcome? Time will tell. In the meantime — just enjoy the colors for a sec and remember, your eyes are not playing tricks on you.

-2625 Noriega: 3 bed, 2 bath, $850,000 [Property Details]

San Francisco Is The Best City, Has The Most College Educated People, Oldest Women, And Most Homeless People, And Lots Of Fog…What Else?

By the numbers: San Francisco has an estimated population of 837,442 (per U.S. Census), we live within 47 square miles, our calves are bursting out of our jeans, and who needs squats (we have hills…apparently 43 – 50 “named” hills). We have a ton of billionaires, and even more homeless. We have old ladies, and lots of lawyers. But really, have a look at the rest.

San Francisco is:

  • America’s best city, per Bloomberg Businessweek
  • 2nd best metro area in the country for resident “well-being” (after San Jose-Santa Clara), per 2014 Gallup/Healthways survey
  • America’s most pretentious city (followed by NYC, Boston & Minneapolis), per Travel + Leisure reader survey
  • 1st in college degrees per square mile: 7031, per U.S. Census; 3rd in graduate degrees per capita (after DC and Seattle), per Forbes
  • 3rd worst metro area commute (after DC and LA): average of 61 hours of delay in traffic per year, per Texas A&M Transportation Institute
  • 5th best city for dogs, per PawNation; est. 120,000 dogs live in SF, per City Govt.
  • Last in children per capita (14%); approx. 113,000 children under 18, per U.S. Census
  • 3rd in lawyers per capita by metro area (after DC & NYC); 2nd highest mean wage for lawyers, $169,000 (after San Jose), per Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • 3rd in number of billionaires (i.e. the Bay Area, after Moscow and New York): 65 billionaires (25 in SF), though it fluctuates depending on stock prices, per SFLuxe
  • 1st in homeless residents per capita, per Philanthropedia; percentage living below poverty level, 13.2%, per U.S. Census
  • 14th largest city in the U.S.; 2nd most densely populated city in the U.S. (after NYC)
  • Misc. Fact – Estimated change in population since 2010: 32,000, per U.S. Census; new housing units added since 2010: approx. 4200, per SF Planning Dept.
  • Highest median asking residential rent in U.S.: $3256/month, per livelovely.com; 4th least affordable city by median-rent-to-median-income ratio – 40.7%, per Zillow
  • Continue reading

    SF vs. NYC – The Debate Continues

    Way back on October 15th, 2007 I wrote a post: Battle Royale: San Francisco or New York City, If You Had To Chose. It was, and still is, an extremely popular article that has garnered over 100 comments, and still ranks incredibly high on search engine queries of the like. For a small shop like mine, that’s pretty impressive. Our readers shared some incredibly good points about both cities, and it is a debate that will likely go on well after I have physically left this Earth, and well after my kin have parted. There will never be a correct answer.

    Like I said back then, San Francisco has a ton of things to offer that New York simply doesn’t (immediate access to outdoor recreation probably falling top of my list), and there are things New York has that San Francisco simply never will (snowstorms and brutally cold weather come to mind). But it is what it is, and it will always be.

    That said, there were a couple articles written recently that I wanted to share with all of you that take a different approach to the topic, because I frequently get clients from out of town wondering what the heck San Francisco is all about. These two articles are not a question of whether one is better than the other, more a question of whether one has BECOME the other. In the end, they can certainly help you draw a conclusion about the city you’re buying into, and the city you might be leaving.

    In my humble opinion, San Francisco will never be New York, and New York will never be eclipsed by San Francisco. New York conjures up the image of power to me, it is the EMPIRE STATE after all. It moves fast. It never sleeps. It’s gritty. It’s tough. San Francisco (and I’ve lived here a while) brings to mind freedom, outdoor living, really smart people changing the world, getting rich, having fun, and living life to the fullest, but they will never have the power and image of the EMPIRE STATE. San Franciscans can puff their chests, but deep down they are fragile. We’re golden boys and girls living in the GOLDEN STATE, and that’s just fine.

    I could go on and on, but I digress. Both cities are amazing in their own right. Both cities have pluses and minuses. But if I’m not mistaken, Tony Bennett did not make famous a song about losing his heart in New York City.

    Just sayin’…

    -Is San Francisco New York [New York Times, Kevin Rose]
    -Why San Francisco Is Not New York [New York Times, Nick Bilton]
    -Battle Royale: San Francisco or New York City, If You Had To Chose [theFrontSteps, Alexander Clark]

    Bay Area Ski Season Is Here! But Wait, Do You Need Tahoe?

    The entire Bay Area is teeming with ski fever. More ski racks are showing up on cars, fleece and Gore-tex wear is on the rise, and non-stop chatter about ski leases is everywhere. But wait! Perhaps you should think more along the lines of an Ocean Beach ski lease.

    With a new swell on the way, and increased crowds out at Ocean Beach here in San Francisco, perhaps this will get your ski fix on, and wave count up?

    The “Islands of San Francisco”. We Can Just Call Them Neighborhoods

    I get a lot of questions along the lines of “where exactly is NOPA?”  Or “We were thinking of selling our home in Noe Valley, and moving to Pacific Heights…where exactly is Pacific Heights’ border?”  

    That kind of stuff.  
    Wonder no more, thanks to Burrito Justice

     

    This cool picture assumes the main streets have all vanished and we are a city of islands. So you can either do your own map mashing to see what streets go where, or just wait til next year when the 9.0 quake that’s coming hits, and the trailing tsunami turns our hills into islands, dust off your gondola (the Italian kind), and take to the streets for your tour…err the canals.